Dress Code Reaction

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  • NBA Headlines Around the League

    Jan. 20, 2006
    1. NBA Dress Code Wears Out Its Welcome With Some

    1. NBA Dress Code Wears Out Its Welcome With Some
    Jeff Caplan of the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM writes, “Still a month until the All-Star break and loopholes are already being exploited in the NBA’s controversial new dress code. And some are starting to talk. “Actually,” Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki said, “Josh has been slipping a little bit lately. Some of the stuff he’s been wearing.” That’s as far as Nowitzki would call out teammate Josh Howard, who, like Nowitzki, was initially a fervent voice of dress-code dissent."


    Jan. 10, 2006
    1. Dress Code Has NBA Players Looking Sharp

    1. Dress Code Has NBA Players Looking Sharp
    Tanika White of THE BALTIMORE SUN writes, "On the basketball court, NBA players dazzle. They're quick. They're flashy. They look good doing what they do. And nowadays, two months after an imposed leaguewide dress code, early fashion reviews are in: These pro ballplayers are looking equally as good off the court."


    Nov. 3, 2005
    1. NBA Players Should Learn Stern is on Their Side

    1. NBA Players Should Learn Stern is on Their Side
    Jason Whitlock of THE KANSAS CITY STAR writes "Stern, understanding that the NBA grew into a multibillion-dollar industry primarily off the labor of black, American-born players, wants his league to remain a place where elite, black American athletes can thrive and earn a nice living."


    Oct. 29, 2005
    1. Charles Oakley on Dress Code

    1. Charles Oakley on Dress Code
    "Allen Iverson has been in the league for 10 years and he's still wearing a T-shirt and jeans. Grow up already," Oakley said. "I'm not trying to sound like some old guy who says this is the way we used to do it. Why not look professional instead of looking like you belong on a street corner?"


    Oct. 28, 2005
    1. Stern Lays out NBA's New Fashion Policy, and it's Going to be Casual
    2. Stern Softens on Dress Code
    3. Even a slob sees the need for NBA code
    4. Stern not making a fashion statement

    1. Stern Lays out NBA's New Fashion Policy, and it's Going to be Casual
    David Moore of THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS recaps Commissioner Stern's tip-off conference call: "Stern said each team will be responsible for enforcement of the dress code and that clubs will be looking for players to adhere to the spirit rather than the letter of the policy. "

    2. Stern Softens on Dress Code
    Dwain Price of THE STAR-TELEGRAM writes that Commissioner David Stern "recognizes that the hip-hop generation has embraced the NBA, and he claims he's not trying to tinker with that."

    3. Even a slob sees the need for NBA code
    Jerry Sullivan of THE BUFFALO NEWS writes "I understand what commissioner David Stern is doing. The NBA is big business, and the business is suffering. Attendance and ratings are down. The league has an image problem. This is a clear attempt to distance the league from last year's Ron Artest brawl, and to alleviate its image as a league of thugs, a reflection of gangsta culture."

    4. Stern not making a fashion statement
    Eric Gilmour of KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS writes "You've got to wonder if commissioner David Stern went too far with his corporate-eye-for-the-NBA-guy dress code. And not only because some players consider the ban on such things as gold chains and retro jerseys to be racist, targeting primarily young blacks who wear hip-hop gear."


    Oct. 27, 2005
    1. Players Unwilling to Redress Dress Code
    2. Dress Code isn't Answer for NBA's Image Problem

    1. Players Unwilling to Redress Dress Code
    Drew Sharp of THE DETROIT FREE PRESS writes, "Athletes should take a moment during the current retrospectives of Rosa Parks' quiet yet volcanic contributions to our nation's social evolution and give themselves an education on what taking a stand for what you truly believe really means. "

    2. Dress Code isn't Answer for NBA's Image Problem
    Tim Kawakami of THE MERCURY NEWS comments on the reaction to the new dress code: "I think Stern has accidentally found a giant blind spot for himself and for anybody over a certain age."


    Oct. 26, 2005
    1. Dressing Up Basketball? Been There, Done That
    2. NBA Dress Code Draws Criticism From Many Corners
    3. Fashionistas Give NBA Skinny on Dressing Well
    4. Dress Code Suitable Only to NBA Suits
    5. Voicing Protest, no Matter the Issue, is a Critical Right
    6. NBA Has a Right to Set Dress Code for its Players

    1. Dressing Up Basketball? Been There, Done That
    John Eligo of THE NEW YORK TIMES writes that NBA players have been dressing up for years: "Sophisticated dress clothes have become as much a part of the hip-hop life - from which many National Basketball Association players take their fashion cues - as oversized T-shirts and sagging, baggy jeans. It is a phenomenon that has gone largely unnoticed by many. "

    2. NBA Dress Code Draws Criticism From Many Corners
    Frank DeFord of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED comments on the reaction to the new dress code: "Since Commissioner Stern came out with his edict last week, the reponses have been more numerous than hurricanes."

    3. Fashionistas Give NBA Skinny on Dressing Well
    In USA TODAY, Julie Ward interviews several fashion insiders about the new dress code: "While some NBA players are grumbling about the new NBA dress code, the guidelines actually are in step with the latest fashion trend. In the workplace, dressing down is out and dressing up is in, according to fashion experts."

    4. Dress Code Suitable Only to NBA Suits
    In THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, Tom Sorensen writes, "Clothes don't make the man. That's the reason the NBA dress code, which is an attempt to sell a sport played primarily by blacks to a ticket-buying audience made up primarily of whites, is unnecessary."

    5. Voicing Protest, no Matter the Issue, is a Critical Right
    In The INDIANAPOLIS STAR, Bob Kravitz writes, "If a rule is targeted at one group of people -- and believe me, this dress code is targeted at one group of people -- then the policymakers should be called to account."

    6. NBA Has a Right to Set Dress Code for its Players
    In THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, Langston Wertz, Jr. writes, "When the players are on team business, the league has every right to ask them to look a certain way."


    Oct. 25, 2005
    1. NBA Dress Code: Welcome to the Marketplace, Gentlemen

    1. NBA Dress Code: Welcome to the Marketplace, Gentlemen
    THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE writes that "dress codes are all about stereotypes, about making customers and clients feel more comfortable with the people who represent a business. In this, the NBA is no different."


    Oct. 23, 2005
    1. Webber: Black Men Can Wear Suits, Too
    2. Smith: Blame Belongs With Players
    3. Lupica: Shooting From the Lip
    4. McKee: Too Much Ado About NBA Dress Code
    5. Too Much on the Dress Code?
    6. Opinions on Dress Code Far From Uniform

    1. Webber: Black Men Can Wear Suits, Too
    In THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Joe Juliano writes that 76ers forward Chris Webber, in an appearance on HBO's "Real Time With Bill Maher," "said that while he has 'a couple of problems' with the new rules, he also has a problem with people who criticize him for having dressed up long before the code arrived."

    2. Smith: Blame Belongs With Players
    Columnist Stephen A. Smith writes in THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, "Long after the whining and moaning subside and the polarizing effects of race dissipate, NBA players will be stuck in the unfamiliar position of having to look in the mirror -- and nowhere else -- for all the travails concerning their sullied image."

    3. Lupica: Shooting From the Lip
    New York DAILY NEWS columnist Mike Lupica writes, "Some of the best people I know in basketball, starting with ex-players from another time, always thought dress codes were silly. And they think the idea is just as silly now. But they understand why (NBA Commissioner David) Stern did this."

    4. McKee: Too Much Ado About NBA Dress Code
    THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER's Don McKee writes, "I don't get the whole hullabaloo about the NBA dress code. ... I've never had any objection to Allen Iverson's off-court dress, or that of any other current superstar. Iverson's big hat and sweatshirt look is far more dressy than that of, say, Larry Bird, who made rumpled blue jeans and golf shirts a fashion statement."

    5. Too Much on the Dress Code?
    Peter May of THE BOSTON GLOBE writes, "For all the blithering blather concerning the dress code, Dallas owner Mark Cuban was on target with his take. Cuban pointed out that all the talk about the code overshadowed the NBA's new and ambitious public service campaign, NBA Cares. Unfortunately, in an age when perception is reality, talk about what Allen Iverson might wear to a game is going to take center stage."

    6. Opinions on Dress Code Far From Uniform
    Mike Wise of THE WASHINGTON POST writes, "(Commissioner) Stern's image-overhaul decision sparked a contentious debate over fashion and race and called attention to a generational chasm between modern professional athletes, many of whom are black, and their mostly white paying customers."


    Oct. 21, 2005
    1. NBA Dress Code Worse For Wear
    2. Dress for Distress
    3. Knicks Already In Code Mode
    4. The N.B.A.'s Latest Edict Already Looks Threadbare
    5. A Few Unsuitable Ideas to Tie into NBA Dress Code
    6. Sports Clothier Finds Victory in NBA Dress Code
    7. Barkley Fully Supports NBA's New Dress Code
    8. Dressing Down the New NBA Code
    9. Dress Code Just a Start

    1. NBA Dress Code Worse For Wear
    From the NEW YORK POST, Phil Mushnick reports, "And now that Stern recognizes that NBAers are showing up to speak at schools and in airports and for TV interviews looking like recruitment officers for the Bloods and Crips, he's pushing a more civil dress code."

    2. Dress for Distress
    From the NEW YORK POST, Peter Vecsey reports, "Seems the phrase Stern had the unprofessional impudence to utter was "dress code" — a demand his citizenry "Dress For Success, not Dress To Confess." Upon hearing the emperor's take on clothes, shock enveloped the land. Just like that, numerous members of the rank and file voiced the kind of outrage normally reserved for, say, more crucial causes.''

    3. Knicks Already In Code Mode
    From the NEW YORK POST, Marc Berman reports, "The new NBA dress code has no effect on the Knicks since they've abided by a much-stricter "Isiah code" since last season. As the Knicks left for their Dallas flight yesterday, the players and coaches departed in their suits and ties, as laid down by Isiah Thomas."

    4. The NBA's Latest Edict Already Looks Threadbare
    From the NEW YORK TIMES, Harvey Araton reports, "Commissioner David Stern seems to have forgotten that his league's most popular team ever, Michael Jordan's Bulls, featured a player who occasionally dressed in drag."

    5. A Few Unsuitable Ideas to Tie into NBA Dress Code
    From the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, Sam Donnellon reports, "The questions in not whether the NBA has gone too far with this dress-code thing. It hasn't. Not even close."

    6. Sports Clothier Finds Victory in NBA Dress Code
    From the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Don Steinberg reports, "One sports fashionista who is surprisingly calm about the new NBA dress code is Peter Capolino, owner of Philadelphia's Mitchell & Ness."

    7. Barkley Fully Supports NBA's New Dress Code
    From the LOS ANGELES TIMES, Larry Stewart reports, "Young black kids dress like NBA players," he said. "Unfortunately, they don't get paid like NBA players. So when they go out in the real world, what they wear is held against them."

    8. Dressing Down the New NBA Code
    From the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Frank Fitzpatrick reports, "Yo, my brothers, you need to chill on our new dress code. It's not racist. We're just trying to let the public know that our sport is played by the same kind of people they encounter each weekend in the Hamptons - lawyers, actuaries and investment bankers, not 7-Eleven bandits and hip-hop hooligans."

    9. Dress Code Just a Start
    From the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sam Smith reports, "I think a big reason why a lot of guys are so popular is because of certain traits of their personality," Pat Garrity said. "But we're athletes and we're asked to express ourselves on the floor. I think that's where the main source of individuality will come out."


    Oct. 20, 2005
    1. Rules Don't Suit A.I.
    2. Pierce Turns Clothes Call Inside Out
    3. Some Claim Rule Rings of Racism
    4. Dress Code Suits Him
    5. Stern Rightly Trying to Tailor New NBA Image
    6. New Dress Code Draws A Few Threads of Protest

    1. Rules Don't Suit A.I.
    From the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, "I don't think it's good for the league. I really don't, because it kind of makes it fake. The whole thing is fake. You've got all these guys with different personalities. Tracy McGrady is different from Kobe. Kevin Garnett is different from Tim Duncan. And I'm different from those guys. Everybody has their own style. It's just unfair when you take that away from people."

    2. Pierce Turns Clothes Call Inside Out
    From the BOSTON HERALD, ``I'm not rolling with that,'' he said last night. ``We're not businessmen. We're entertainers, and I think you should be able to dress how you feel. I think that's the beauty of us, that we have that kind of creativity to be able to express ourselves.''

    3. Some Claim Rule Rings of Racism
    From the NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, "I have no problem dressing up . . . because I know I'm a nice-looking guy. But as far as chains, I definitely feel that's a racial statement. Almost 100% of the guys in the league who are young and black wear big chains," Indiana guard/forward Stephen Jackson told the Indianapolis Star. "So I definitely don't agree with that at all."

    4. Dress Code Suits Him
    From the LOS ANGELES TIMES, "I respect and love Allen, but I differ with his opinion on this," John Thompson said. "I think this is based on some of the things that have occurred in the league over the last year [most notably the player-fan melee in Detroit]. If nothing else, you've got a perception problem."

    5. Stern Rightly Trying to Tailor New NBA Image
    From the USA TODAY, "It's a little bit extreme," Brevin Knight said, "unless they are going to give us some type of voucher for clothes for guys who don't make the same amount as other people."

    6. New Dress Code Draws A Few Threads of Protest
    From the WASHINGTON POST, "I think a big reason why a lot of guys are so popular is because of certain traits of their personality," Pat Garrity said. "But we're athletes and we're asked to express ourselves on the floor. I think that's where the main source of individuality will come out."


    Oct. 19, 2005
    1. Wardrobe Rules Leave Players Unfazed
    2. NBA Dress Code Decrees: Clothes Make the Image
    3. NBA Players' Rags to Cost them Riches
    4. Dressing Down is Out
    5. New Dress Code Suits Few
    6. Jackson Glad to See Dress Code
    7. Carter No Fan of Rules
    8. Celtics Will Follow Suit on Dress Code
    9. James on Dress Code
    10. Pacers' Jackson Calls Ban on Chains Racist Statement
    11. Mavs Mixed on Dressing Up
    12. Clothes Call
    13. Raps Cool With the Dress Code
    14. Stern Sure Players Will Comply With Dress Code
    15. Is the NBA Hanging on by a Thread?
    16. Dress Code Masks Other Problems
    17. Good Guys Can Dress Bad
    18. Stern's Power Trip Unfashionable


    Player Reaction

    1. Wardrobe rules leave players unfazed
    From the INDY STAR, "I think it's a good thing," said Austin Croshere, the Pacers' player representative. "I think there should be some creative expression on the part of the players to dress in a manner that fits them, but at the same time to portray the professionalism the league wants."

    2. NBA Announces Dress Code, NBA CARES
    From the NEW YORK TIMES, "We decided that the reputation of our players was not as good as our players are, and we could do small things to improve that." said Commissioner David Stern.

    3. NBA Players' Rags to Cost them Riches
    From the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, "Business casual should be doable," said Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki, who often arrives to games in a T-shirt or sweat shirt. "It's not that bad. "But I have to change my wardrobe here pretty quick."

    4. Dressing Down is Out
    From the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, "I think it's going to be an adjustment for a lot of players," Ben Gordon said. "I saw some things about jewelry. That's a big fad for younger guys in the league."

    5. New Dress Code Suits Few
    From the DETROIT FREE PRESS, "Most people dress according to their culture and their ethnic background," said Dale Davis, a 14-year veteran. "You almost embrace the culture, and now it's taken away. That's tough."

    6. Jackson Glad to See Dress Code
    From the L.A. DAILY NEWS, "To a majority of these young men," Phil Jackson said, "the rap stars, hip-hop guys are really kind of like heroes or colleagues ... We even have some that are owners in the league. And it's not the same audience. Our audience is corporate businessmen and businesswomen and kids. So it's a different audience that you're dealing with and these players should be aware of that."

    7. Carter No Fan of Rules
    From the BERGEN RECORD, "I just think people should be able to express themselves," Vince Carter said. "I know they took out the doo-rag stuff; I understand that. As far as guys wearing what they want to wear, I am all for that. Who really cares about what they wear from the bus to the locker room?"

    8. Celtics Will Follow Suit on Dress Code
    From the BOSTON HERALD, ``I mean, it's cool,'' Ricky Davis said. ``It's not real harsh. It just changes the image a little. Guys just got to grow up I guess. They're just trying to exclude some things. It's simple to me. Guys need to go out and buy some clothes and start something new.''

    9. LeBron James on Dress Code
    From the CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, "No it's not a big deal, not to me," LeBron James said. "Sometimes you feel lazy and you don't feel like putting some clothes on, but this is a job. We are going to have fun, but this is a job and we should look like we're going to work, that's the way they feel.

    10. Pacers' Jackson Calls Ban on Chains Racist Statement
    From ESPN, "I think it's a racist statement because a lot of the guys who are wearing chains are my age and are black," said Jackson, 27. "I wore all my jewelry today to let it be known that I'm upset with it."

    11. Mavs Mixed on Dressing Up
    From the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, "I don't like it," Josh Howard said. "I just don't think it's right. A lot of people feel comfortable in what they wear and what they wear to the game, but it's going to be difficult for a lot of guys."

    12. Clothes Call
    From the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL, "For the most part, guys are already dressing pretty decent," said Bucks guard T.J. Ford. "I don't think guys are coming in tacky; the attire was neat. This was a rule they came up with, and we've got to follow the rules or they're going to take our money."

    13. Raps Cool With the Dress Code
    From the TORONTO SUN, "They're probably scared your kid will be wearing a bandana," Jalen Rose said. "But at the end of the day, whatever I wear to the game, whether I have on jewelry, a sports coat or not, when I dribble up the court, I'm still going to hear Notorious B, I'm still going to hear Tupac."

    14. Stern Sure Players Will Comply With Dress Code
    From ESPN, "If they are really going to have a problem, they will have to make a decision about how they want to spend their adult life in terms of playing in the NBA or not," David Stern said.


    Columnist

    15. Is the NBA Hanging on by a Thread?
    From the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, Rich Hoffman reports, "If the NBA has a problem, it is not an image problem - it is a reality problem. And the harshest reality of all? That the league's salary-cap system is a disaster, because it is too difficult to dig out of a hole once a team has fallen into it."

    16. Dress Code Masks Other Problems
    From the L.A. TIMES, Mark Heisler reports, "The NBA's real battle is not the one that's fought each spring over its championship, but the one for the hearts and minds of a national audience it dazzled, then lost and now yearns for."

    17. Good Guys Can Dress Bad
    From the WASHINGTON TIMES, Tom Knott reports, "Are there some bad guys in the NBA, just as there are bad guys in any profession? Of course. But look around the NBA, and most of the leading players are solid citizens who stay out of trouble and connect with the communities they represent."

    18. Stern's Power Trip Unfashionable
    From the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, Kevin B. Blackistone reports, "I can understand if Stern wants to, as he's already done, make on-the-court wear more uniform, like putting a limit on how long hemlines on shorts can fall. We tune into or turn out for NBA games to watch the players on the court. I don't know of anyone yet who has checked out a game to see what the eternal injured reserve player is wearing on the end of the bench. Maybe Stern does."

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