Look Into the Future

January 24, 2013
RSS
Adam Silver

With the completion of the Cavaliers’ recent deal with Memphis, the Wine and Gold have a bounty of first- and second-rounders coming their way over the next few years.

The stipulations can be complicated and involve several teams and scenarios. The following isn’t exactly light reading. But it’s likely to have a happy ending.

Please pay attention to the two important notes at the bottom. Aside from that, for all you Cavalier future-gazers and draftniks out there, here’s a look at what the Wine and Gold have coming in Drafts down the road …


2013 – The Cavaliers have their own first-round pick, Sacramento’s (top 13 protected) and Miami’s pick (top 10 protected). The Cavs also have the right to swap the Lakers pick (which now belongs to Phoenix and is top 14 protected) with the most favorable of those picks. Cleveland also has its own second-round selection and Orlando’s second-rounder.

What It Means – The Cavaliers acquired the Kings pick two summers ago in the Omri Casspi-for-J.J. Hickson trade. The Kings would have to reach the Playoffs this season for Cleveland to acquire the pick for this upcoming Draft. The Cavs received the Lakers’ pick (along with Luke Walton) in exchange for Ramon Sessions midway through last season.

Simply put, if the Lakers make the Playoffs this season, the Cavs will likely take that pick – which is almost certain to be better than Miami’s. If the Lakers don’t make the postseason, the Suns get L.A.’s pick and Cleveland will take Miami’s.

Either way, the Cavaliers have two first-rounders due in this year’s Draft.

The second-rounders are pretty straightforward. Cleveland acquired them (one in 2013 and one in 2014) on Draft night 2011, in exchange for the No. 32 pick – Richmond’s Justin Harper, now with the D-League’s Idaho Stampede.


2014 – The Cavaliers have their own first-round pick as well as Sacramento’s pick (top 12 protected) if it hasn’t already been used. Cleveland also has Miami’s pick (top 10 protected) if it hasn’t already been conveyed. The Cavs also have their own second-round pick – plus Memphis’ second-rounder and another second-round pick from Orlando.

What It Means – The Cavs have their own first-rounder and – if they didn’t use the Lakers’ pick in 2013 – will also have Miami’s first-round pick. They can receive the Kings’ first-round choice should Sacramento (or Seattle, by then) be drafting outside the top 12.

In 2014, Cleveland has three second-round picks. Along with their own second-rounder, the Cavaliers will receive the Grizzlies’ choice – acquired in the D.J. Kennedy-for-Jeremy Pargo deal this summer – as well as the second second-rounder from Orlando.


2015 – The Wine and Gold have their own first-round choice, plus Sacramento's pick (top 10 protected) if it hasn’t already been used. They also have Miami’s first-round pick if it hasn’t yet been used. The Cavaliers also have Memphis’ first-round pick (protected 1-5 and 15-30) if Memphis has satisfied their first-round obligation to Minnesota already (The T-Wolves get Memphis’ first-round pick the first year that Memphis makes the Playoffs starting with 2013.) Memphis can then trade their first-round pick two years after that to the Cavs. So Cleveland can potentially receive Memphis’ first-rounder starting in 2015.

The Cavs also have their own second-round pick in 2015.

What It Means – Cleveland has its own first-rounder and – again, depending on if they’ve used Miami’s or Sacramento’s – will have their picks as well. In 2015 and 2016, Sacramento’s pick is only top 10 protected. With the Kings improvement, and their continued improvement when they move to the Pacific Northwest, this could bode well for the Wine and Gold.

This is the first year that Cleveland can acquire the Grizzlies’ first-rounder they just dealt to the Cavaliers this past week – along with Marreese Speights, Wayne Ellington and Josh Selby – for Jon Leuer.

Minnesota only gets this first-rounder if the Grizzlies don’t make the Playoffs this year. (And they’re currently in the 4th spot and 10 games over .500.) Otherwise, the Cavaliers have the opportunity to get the pick should Memphis wind up with a pick in the No. 6 to No. 14 range.


2016 – The Cavaliers have their own first-round choice, plus Sacramento's pick (top 10 protected) if not already used. They may also have Miami's pick (top 10 protected) if not already used. If not conveyed in 2015, Cavs also have Memphis’s first round pick (protected 1-5 and 15-30) if Memphis has satisfied their first round obligation to Minnesota already.

The Cavs also have their own second-round selection in 2016.

What It Means – The stipulations in 2016 are similar to those in 2015. The Cavaliers have their own first-rounder and are eligible to receive Miami’s and Sacramento’s if they haven’t already done so. Both picks are top 10 protected once again.

In terms of the Grizzlies’ 2016 first-rounder, the Cavs are again counting on Memphis finishing in the 6-14 range.


2017 – Cleveland has its own first- and second-round selections. If not already conveyed, the Cavs also have Memphis’s first round pick (top 5 protected) if Memphis has satisfied their first round obligation to Minnesota already.

What It Means – The Cavaliers have their own first rounder and, if they haven’t already used the pick from Memphis, can do so in 2017. The difference between this pick and the conditions of the two previous seasons is that it’s only protected through the top five picks.


2018 – The Wine and Gold has their own first round pick and their own second round pick. If not conveyed earlier, the Cavs also have Memphis’ first-round pick (top 5 protected) if the Grizzlies have already satisfied their first round obligation to Minnesota.

What It Means – Again, the Cavaliers have their own first-rounder and, as in the previous year, will also have Memphis’ top pick assuming it doesn’t fall within the first five selections.


2019 – The Cavaliers have their own first- and second-round pick. If not conveyed in earlier, the Cavs also have Memphis’s first round pick, unprotected

What It Means – This year is simple: The Cavaliers have their own pick and, if they haven’t already received the first-rounder from the Grizzlies, will get this one completely unprotected – No. 1 through No. 30.


NOTE 1: The Cavaliers own TWO first-round picks from Miami. They are both top 10 protected. Assuming Cleveland gets the first of those in 2013, the first allowable year the second pick can be received is 2015. If the first of those picks is not received until 2015, it is unprotected. The next pick would be received in 2017 – unprotected as well.

NOTE 2: If Cleveland hasn’t received Sacramento's first-round pick by 2017, then Sacramento will convey its 2017 second-round pick (protected 56-60) to Cleveland. If the choice is not within the top 55 picks, the Kings’ obligation to Cleveland will be extinguished.