Kobe Bryant stands near the No. 24 placed on the floor during his final game on April 13, 2016.
(Ty Nowell/Lakers.com)

Kobe's Final Game: By the Numbers

by Joey Ramirez
Digital Reporter

When the basketball world looks back on Kobe Bryant's final game, the number that will stand out will obviously be 60, as the retiring superstar exploded for one last scoring binge. But there are plenty more digits worthy of remembrance from the finale of No. 24.

0: Shots made by Bryant in the game’s first six minutes. The 20-year veteran admitted having nerves in the beginning, as he missed his first five shots, including one that failed to hit the rim.

1: Block by Bryant. His first basket came via his own hustle on the other end, as he swatted Trevor Booker’s layup before getting the ball back on the other end and pump-faking Gordon Hayward before cashing over Jeff Withey.

2: Turnovers that Bryant committed. Though he missed plenty of shots due to his massive shooting volume, Bryant still took care of the ball. He allowed only a couple giveaways, despite recording a 60.5 usage rate nearly four times that of the next-closest Laker, D’Angelo Russell (15.2).

2.65 Miles traveled by Bryant, more than any other Laker that night. In 42 minutes played, he put some extra tread on his tires, as Utah’s Trey Lyles (2.68) was the only player on the floor to tally more.

4: Assists by Bryant. When not putting up a historic number of shots, Bryant still managed to find time for his teammates, especially Jordan Clarkson, who was the recipient of three of Bryant’s dimes, including a football-style, fullcourt pass on the final play of the Black Mamba’s career.

13: Unanswered points by Bryant in the final two minutes. With his team down by 10 and only 2:36 left, Bryant went on a one-man rampage that culminated with a 19-foot, lead-stealing jumper and two free throws to ice the victory in the final minute.

16: Unassisted baskets by Bryant. The Lakers simply let their leader do his thing, especially down the stretch, as his final seven baskets went without an assist attached. D’Angelo Russell did set him up a few times, tallying half of Los Angeles’ six dimes to Bryant.

18: Contested shots made by Bryant. The now-retiree hit 18-of-40 with a defender within 3.5 feet, which was even better than his 4-of-10 clip on open looks.

22: Points that Bryant scored in the paint. He didn’t rely on his patented post-ups, instead blowing by defenders and navigating the interior defense for layups. However, he was even more active from outside, shooting 6-of-21 on 3-pointers.

32.6: Percentage shot by the Lakers in their first three games against the Jazz, all of which were losses. Los Angeles had averaged just 77.0 points versus Utah, but managed 101 points on 48.2 percent in the finale, thanks largely to Bryant.

37: Bryant’s age on the day of his last game. It had been seven years since his previous 60-point game, when he set the Madison Square Garden scoring record with 61 points on Feb. 2, 2009.

50: Shots taken by Bryant, the most in at least 33 years. The previous record during this span was held by Michael Jordan, who put up 49 in a loss to Orlando on Jan. 16, 1993. Bryant took 15 more shots than the rest of his teammates combined.

60: Bryant’s final point total. No other player in the NBA this season scored as many in one game as he did that night.

18,997: People in attendance at sold-out STAPLES Center for the final game of Bryant's career.

5.2 million: Estimated nationwide viewers who witnessed Bryant’s historic night on ESPN2 and Time Warner Cable SportsNet.

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