Boston Celtics 2015 Draft Profiles
Jordan Mickey
Jordan Mickey
F | 6'8" | 235 LBS.
15.4 PPG | 9.9 RPG | 1.3 APG

Video

Draft Profile Video: Jordan Mickey

Amanda Pflugrad interviews LSU head coach Johnny Jones about forward Jordan Mickey and how he dominated with his shot blocking at the high school and collegiate levels.
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Draft Profile Video: Jordan Mickey

Amanda Pflugrad interviews LSU head coach Johnny Jones about forward Jordan Mickey and how he dominated with his shot blocking at the high school and collegiate levels.
Jun 25, 2015  |  05:03

Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the author(s) and don't represent the opinions of the Celtics front office.

NBA Draft Combine Measurements

Body/Anthropometric Measurements
Body Fat % 7.20%
Hand Length 8.75"
Hand Width 9.50"
Height w/o Shoes 6'7.0"
Height w/ Shoes 6'8.25"
Standing Reach 8'10.0"
Weight 238.0
Wingspan 7'3.25"
Physical Tests
Lane Agility 11.72
Shuttle Run 3.13
Three-Quarter Court Sprint 3.28
Standing Vertical Leap 33.0"
Max Vertical Leap 37.5"
Body/Anthropometric Measurements
Body Fat % Hand Length Hand Width Height w/o Shoes Height w/ Shoes Standing Reach Weight Wingspan
7.20% 8.75" 9.50" 6'7.0" 6'8.25" 8'10.0" 238.0 7'3.25"
Physical Tests
Lane Agility Shuttle Run 3/4 Court Sprint Standing Vertical Leap Max Vertical Leap
11.72 3.13 3.28 33.0" 37.5"

Pros/Cons

Pros Cons
Length Age
Leaping Ability Undersized
Shot Blocking Turnover Prone
Offensive Potential Decision Making
Runs the Floor Must Bulk Up

Why You Might Know Him

Only two players in Louisiana State University basketball history have ever tallied at least 100 blocked shots in a single season: Shaquille O’Neal (three times) and Jordan Mickey (twice). At 6-foot-8, Mickey does not have the appearance of an elite shot-blocker, but boasting a 7-3 wingspan, the sophomore led the nation with 3.6 swats per game this past season.

Scouting Report

One thing you can’t miss when you watch Jordan Mickey is his ability to block shots. He’s an elite shot blocker off of the weak side. He has fantastic instincts, timing, length and hand-eye coordination. He’ll be able to block shots at the NBA level. However, I’m not in love with his overall defensive abilities. His defensive mobility and lateral quickness are not on par with his shot-blocking skills. That’s why he struggles to stay in front of quicker players. He also struggles against true size and bulk, and he’s going to see more of that quickness and bulk at the NBA level. Mickey has skills at the offensive end but is very erratic. He hasn’t nearly reached his full offensive potential. He’s a turnover machine for many reasons, including playing out of control, making poor decisions and not being strong with the ball. He gets swallowed up by double-teams. He oftentimes decides on a move ahead of time rather than reading and reacting. He can finish above the rim with his elite leaping ability, but he rarely does unless it’s an alley-oop. He showcases a move-plus-counter-move, which is intriguing. Mickey also has good form on his jumper and should become reliable from 15 to 20 feet; he could eventually extend to 3-point range. He runs the floor very well. In addition to his shot blocking and his offensive potential, Mickey is also a fantastic rebounder. He attacks loose balls and makes great reads on shots. Those are instincts that almost always translate to the next level.

Biography

Jordan Mickey was born on July 9, 1994 in Dallas, Tex. His father James Wright played center at Abilene Christian University and was the Lone Star Conference MVP in 1984-85 when he averaged 15.2 points and 10.2 rebounds per game. Mickey attended Arlington Grace Prep for three years, guiding the program to a state championship during his junior season, before transferring to Prime Prep Academy. During his lone campaign with Prime Prep, he averaged 16 points, 10 rebounds and two blocks per game. Mickey was an immediate contributor when he began his freshman season at LSU, compiling double-doubles during each of his first three contests. He started all 34 of the Tigers’ games and averaged 12.7 points and 7.9 rebounds per game. He also became just the second Tiger in program history to block at least 100 shots in a season, joining Shaquille O’Neal. This past season, Mickey led the nation in blocked shots per game (3.6), along with 15.4 PPG and 9.9 RPG. He blocked at least six shots in four straight contests from Dec. 18 through Jan. 3. In the second round of the NCAA Tournament, he tallied 12 points, 14 rebounds and six blocks, but the Tigers were edged by North Carolina State University, 66-65. Mickey declared for the NBA Draft on March 31.