50 Best Bucks Player Seasons Of All-Time: 50-26

by Alex Boeder
Bucks.com Writer

This is a story (arriving in three parts; read part one here) about the 50 best seasons by Bucks players out of 818 seasons by anyone who (has thus far) played a minute in franchise history. That means Jerald Honeycutt and Roko Ukic were considered.

For the purposes of these rankings, this is the 50 best seasons. So, regular seasons and postseasons are combined. Why look at these things separately?

This is a list of the best individual seasons, so players are not penalized for a barren supporting cast. That said, the best players in their best seasons typically carry their team to wins. So team performance, like everything else, is a reflection, a factor.

We have the benefit now of looking at advanced stats that did not exist during most of these 50 years. We have the difficulty of comparing across eras, especially tough when you consider that the 3-point line did not debut until 1979, and that steals and blocks were not tracked until 1973. Having never watched anyone play live before 1990 adds another challenge (for me). Was it easier to become an All-Star and make the playoffs when there were fewer teams and players in the league (and fewer people playing basketball in the world)?

Injuries and partial seasons befell some of the most promising campaigns, such as Glenn Robinson averaging a career-high 23.4 points in 56 games in 1997–98, and Michael Redd averaging a career-high 26.7 points in 53 games in 2006–07. There is no hard rule for how many games a player needs to play to make the list, but when you are up against the best seasons ever, it is hard to do enough (short of something extraordinary) to stack up in fewer than 60 games.

The goal is to rank the 50 best seasons with as much context (era, rules, teammates, and so on) as possible. To rank based on how much value each player provided the Bucks during that season.

Here's the list from #50-26:

50. Brian Winters (1977–78)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG: 19.9 RPG: 3.1 APG: 4.9
SPG: 1.6 BPG: 0.3
FG%: .463 3PT%: N/A FT%: .840 TS%: .503
PER: 16.4 WS: 5.1

Playoffs
G:
9
PPG: 20.4 RPG: 3.3 APG: 6.4
SPG: 1.3 BPG: 0.9
FG%: .497 3PT%: N/A FT%: .741 TS%: .520
PER: 16.4 WS: 0.6

Team: 44–38 in regular season (8th of 22 teams), 2–0 win over Suns in Western Conference First Round, 4–3 loss to Nuggets in Western Conference Semifinals

Honors: All-Star

Resume: A shooting guard who could shoot (for the first half of his career there was no 3-point line, for the second half of his career, he was one of the better long-distance shooters around), yes, but also a shooting guard who could (and did) pass. Set career-highs in points, assists, and steals. Led the team in scoring in the regular season and then topped it off with perhaps the best playoff run of his career.

Game of Note: Out-shot Gail Goodrich (31 points) in a 122–120 shootout over the Jazz, finishing with 37 points including 15–17 at the line.

 

49. Sidney Moncrief (1980–81)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
14.0 RPG: 5.1 APG: 3.3
SPG: 1.1 BPG: 0.5
FG%: .541 3PT%: .222 FT%: .804 TS%: .614
PER: 18.0 WS: 9.9

Playoffs
G:
7
PPG:
14.0 RPG: 6.7 APG: 2.9
SPG: 1.7 BPG: 0.4
FG%: .435 3PT%: N/A FT%: .745 TS%: .536
PER: 12.6 WS: 0.5

Team: 60–22 in regular season (3rd of 23 teams), 4–3 loss to 76ers in Eastern Conference Semifinals

Honors: N/A

Resume: Sure, the traditional per-game numbers were not what they soon what would be for Moncrief. But in just his second year in the league, Moncrief was the advanced stats darling of 1981, if 1981 could have had one, hitting leaderboards like True Shooting Percentage (7th), Effective Field Goal Percentage (15th), Offensive Rating (1st), Offensive Win Shares (12th), Win Shares (13th), Win Shares Per Minute (8th), Box Plus/Minus (13th), and Value Over Replacement Player (16th). The Bucks won 60 games, and Moncrief might have been the second-most important reason.

Game of Note: Led the team with 27 points (setting what was a career-high at the time) in a win over Bill Cartwright and the 50-win Knicks.

48. Bob Dandridge (1972–73)

Regular Season
G:
73
PPG:
20.2 RPG: 8.2 APG: 2.8
SPG: N/A BPG: N/A
FG%: .472 3PT%: N/A FT%: .789 TS%: .504
PER: 16.2 WS: 8.1

Playoffs
G:
6
PPG:
13.8 RPG: 4.7 APG: 1.2
SPG: N/A BPG: N/A
FG%: .421 3PT%: N/A FT%: .704 TS%: .472
PER: 11.3 WS: 0.3

Team: 60–22 in regular season (2nd of 17 teams), 4–2 loss to Warriors in Western Conference Semifinals

Honors: All-Star

Resume: The second-leading scorer on one of the best regular season teams in franchise history, a team that won 60 games and profiled to win 62 based on point differential. Picked as an All-Star for the first of four times. Pulled in a career-best 8.2 rebounds. Hit the top-20 in Defensive Win Shares, too.

Game of Note: Put up 33 points (on 12–17 from the field and 9–10 from the line) and seven assists in a win over Tiny Archibald (prime Tiny Archibald, who led the league in scoring and assists) and the Kings.

47. Ricky Pierce (1986–87)

Regular Season
G:
79
PPG:
19.5 RPG: 3.4 APG: 1.8
SPG: 0.8 BPG: 0.3
FG%: .534 3PT%: .107 FT%: .880 TS%: .606
PER: 18.5 WS: 9.4

Playoffs
G:
12
PPG:
15.9 RPG: 2.3 APG: 1.3
SPG: 0.8 BPG: 0.4
FG%: .479 3PT%: N/A FT%: .821 TS%: .557
PER: 15.0 WS: 0.5

Honors: Sixth Man of the Year

Team: 50–32 in regular season (6th of 23 teams), 3–2 win over 76ers in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–3 loss to Celtics in Eastern Conference Semifinals

Resume: Runaway winner of Sixth Man of the Year, ahead of Vinnie Johnson and Michael Cooper. Came off the bench for the vast majority (48) of his 79 games, so the award was well-deserved, but make no mistake: Pierce played the third-most minutes on the team (nearly the second-most) and was arguably the second-most important (/best/valuable) player on this 50-win team. (Paul Pressey has a case, but he missed 22 games.) A consistent and extra-efficient scorer, Pierce averaged nearly 20 per game on fewer than 14 field goal attempts per game, largely because he made most of his shots and got to the line a ton (made 7+ free throws in 21 regular season games).

Game of Note: Scored 29 (off the bench, naturally) on 10–14 shooting from the field and 9–10 from the line to propel the Bucks to a Game 3 win over Larry Bird and the Celtics.

46. Bob Dandridge (1973–74)

Regular Season
G:
71
PPG:
18.9 RPG: 6.7 APG: 2.8
SPG: 1.6 BPG: 0.6
FG%: .503 3PT%: N/A FT%: .818 TS%: .535
PER: 17.0 WS: 8.4

Playoffs
G:
16
PPG:
19.3 RPG: 7.6 APG: 2.8
SPG: 1.4 BPG: 0.6
FG%: .493 3PT%: N/A FT%: .766 TS%: .519
PER: 16.5 WS: 1.9

Honors: N/A

Team: 59–23 in regular season (1st of 17 teams), 4–1 win over Lakers in Western Conference Semifinals, 4–0 win over Bulls in Western Conference Finals, 4–3 loss to Celtics in Finals

Resume: Pictured: Right (your right). Over the course of the entire regular season and playoffs, Dandridge was probably the second-most productive player on the Bucks, after Kareem. (This was the final season of Oscar Robertson’s career.) And we are talking about a Bucks team that was one game from winning the championship. Greyhound (nickname: good) was the number two scorer on the team after Kareem, shot the second-best percentage from the field of his career, and got after it defensively, posting a career-high 1.6 steals.

Game of Note: The Big 3 was rounding into playoff form, with Kareem going for 43, Oscar netting a triple-double, and Dandridge going for 26/9/10, in a win over the Trail Blazers in the second-to-last game of the regular season.

45. Sam Cassell (2002–03)

Regular Season
G:
78
PPG:
19.7 RPG: 4.4 APG: 5.8
SPG: 1.1 BPG: 0.2
FG%: .470 3PT%: .362 FT%: .861 TS%: .565
PER: 22.3 WS: 9.6

Playoffs
G:
6
PPG:
17.2 RPG: 3.2 APG: 2.7
SPG: 0.5 BPG: 0.2
FG%: .470 3PT%: .524 FT%: .933 TS%: .575
PER: 13.5 WS: 0.1

Team: 42–40 in regular season (16th of 29 teams), 4–2 loss to Nets in Eastern Conference First Round

Honors: N/A

Resume: The steady, heady force of the second-best offense in basketball (and third-best offense in franchise history, in terms of relative offensive efficiency) in a chaotic season defined by Ray Allen being traded to Seattle for Gary Payton and Desmond Mason. Lost in that whirlwind was Cassell delivering one of the most efficient offensive seasons of his career, hitting threes at the best rate of his life to that point and finishing with his second-best True Shooting Percentage (.565) and second-best PER (22.3), along with career-bests in rebounds per game (4.4 rebounds), Turnover Percentage (11.5), and Offensive Win Shares (8.8). Stats, stats, stats, good stats.

Game of Note: In an absurd, double-overtime 140–133 win over Ricky Davis (who dropped 45/8/5…) and the Cavaliers (the year before LeBron arrived), Cassell put up 39/10/10 along with two steals (and just two turnovers) in 50 minutes.

44. Andrew Bogut (2009–10)

Regular Season
G:
69
PPG:
15.9 RPG: 10.2 APG: 1.8
SPG: 0.6 BPG: 2.5
FG%: .520 3PT%: .000 FT%: .629 TS%: .540
PER: 16.2 WS: 7.5

Playoffs
N/A

Team: 46–36 in regular season (14th of 30 teams), 4–3 loss to Hawks in Eastern Conference First Round

Honors: All-NBA 3rd Team

Resume: Here, in the apex of his career, Bogut’s defensive mastery could hardly be overstated. Not only was he an elite shot-blocker, he also conquered the subtleties of offensive actions and snuffed them out before they materialized, whether it was sliding in to draw a charge or stepping in the right direction to dissuade a would-be driver. The Bucks ranked second in the NBA in defensive efficiency, and owed much of that to Bogut. He also peaked as an offensive player this season, with a career-high 15.9 points per game. Also here, in the prime of his career, a substantial sigh: Would be higher on this list if not for sustaining multiple, season-ending injuries in an early-April game while the Bucks were on a 21–7 run (like, wins and losses, not points during a game) that made them the hottest team in the league.

Game of Note: Massive in an 86–84 win over the Finals runners-up Celtics and Kevin Garnett, with 25 points, 17 rebounds, and a couple blocks.

43. Flynn Robinson (1969–70)

Regular Season
G:
81
PPG:
21.8 RPG: 3.2 APG: 5.5
SPG: N/A BPG: N/A
FG%: .477 3PT%: N/A FT%: .898 TS%: .549
PER: 19.3 WS: 9.3

Playoffs
G:
10
PPG:
12.8 RPG: 2.3 APG: 5.0
SPG: N/A BPG: N/A
FG%: .326 3PT%: N/A FT%: .880 TS%: .424
PER: 11.5 WS: -0.2

Team: 56–26 in regular season (2nd of 14 teams), 4–1 win over 76ers in Eastern Division Semifinals, 4–1 loss to Knicks in Eastern Division Finals

Honors: All-Star

Resume: A particular rookie from UCLA helped transform the Bucks into in an instant contender this season, but he wasn’t the only All-Star on the team doing so. Robinson, in his second and final season in Milwaukee, and in the thick of his prime at age 28, made the top-20 league leaderboard in points per game (14th, scoring nearly as many points per minute as Kareem), assists per game (12th), free throws made (13th), free throw percentage (1st), Win Shares (12th), and PER (11th), to name a few.

Game of Note: Let’s go with that 42-point night in Cincinnati a couple days after Christmas in 1969 against Oscar Robertson (who got 31 and the two-point win).

42. Oscar Robertson (1972–73)

Regular Season
G:
73
PPG:
15.5 RPG: 4.9 APG: 7.5
SPG: 1.0 BPG: 1.4
FG%: .454 3PT%: N/A FT%: .847 TS%: .511
PER: 17.2 WS: 8.4

Playoffs
G:
6
PPG:
21.2 RPG: 4.7 APG: 7.5
SPG: N/A BPG: N/A
FG%: .500 3PT%: N/A FT%: .912 TS%: .572
PER: 21.0 WS: 1.3

Team: 60–22 in regular season (2nd of 17 teams), 4–2 loss to Warriors in Western Conference Semifinals

Honors: N/A

Resume: Still had it, at 34, in his second-to-last season in the league. Finished fourth in the league in assists per game, helping Kareem average 30 points. And then he reached back a few years into his prime for the playoffs, leading all players in the postseason (albeit in just six games) in — and here is not how the newspapers put it in 1974 — True Shooting Percentage and Win Shares per minute.

Game of Note: In Game 3 against the Warriors, went for 34 points (on 13–17 from the field and 9–10 at the line) along with eight assists in a road win.

41. Alvin Robertson (1989–90)

Regular Season
G:
82
PPG:
14.2 RPG: 6.9 APG: 5.5
SPG: 2.6 BPG: 0.2
FG%: .503 3PT%: .154 FT%: .741 TS%: .542
PER: 18.9 WS: 7.5

Playoffs
G:
4
PPG:
23.5 RPG: 5.8 APG: 4.8
SPG: 2.3 BPG: 0.0
FG%: .522 3PT%: .000 FT%: .706 TS%: .573
PER: 19.7 WS: 0.2

Team: 44–38 in regular season (12th of 27 teams), 3–1 loss to Bulls in Eastern Conference First Round

Honors: All-Defensive 2nd Team

Resume: Six foot three and 185 pounds, and one of the best offensive rebounders in the league (honestly, he ranked 20th in the NBA in offensive rebounds, at six foot three and 185 pounds). Fourth in the league in steals per game. A close second on the team in assists. And if you are getting the impression that Robertson could do everything but score: Take a look at those playoff numbers (23.5 points per game) against Michael Jordan and the Bulls. In Game 3 of that series, upon coming home to Milwaukee after dropping two games in Chicago, Robertson put up 38/8/7 (MJ countered with, oh, 48/9/5). Advanced stats back up his impact: 10th in the league in Box Plus/Minus and 11th in Value Over Replacement Player.

Game of Note: From the Wish I Saw This One As It Happened file, like the Game 3 noted above: 37/16/8 with four steals and two blocks in a win over the Warriors of Run TMC (Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, Chris Mullin) and Manute Bol.

40. Sam Cassell (1999–00)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
18.6 RPG: 3.7 APG: 9.0
SPG: 1.6 BPG: 0.3
FG%: .466 3PT%: .289 FT%: .876 TS%: .551
PER: 21.1 WS: 9.2

Playoffs
G:
5
PPG:
15.8 RPG: 3.4 APG: 9.0
SPG: 0.8 BPG: 0.0
FG%: .417 3PT%: .200 FT%: .857 TS%: .486
PER: 18.5 WS: 0.5

Team: 42–40 in regular season (15th of 29 teams), 3–2 loss to Pacers in Eastern Conference First Round

Honors: N/A

Resume: After playing for four teams (Rockets, Suns, Mavericks, Nets) and being a part of trades involving Charles Barkley, Jason Kidd, and Stephon Marbury (and so many others) in his 20s, Sam I Am fit (better than a glove) in Milwaukee, where he would play for more than three consecutive seasons with the same team for the first (and only) time. In his first full season with the Bucks, he set new career-highs in assists and field goal percentage, while starting the process of helping to maximize the efficiency of co-stars Ray Allen and Glenn Robinson.

Game of Note: Opening Night 1999: 35 points (on 15–20 shooting from the field) and 11 assists in a win over the Rockets (and Hakeem at age-37, Barkley in his final season, and rookie Steve Francis, oh my).

39. Terry Cummings (1985–86)

Regular Season
G:
82
PPG:
19.8 RPG: 8.5 APG: 2.4
SPG: 1.5 BPG: 0.6
FG%: .474 3PT%: .000 FT%: .656 TS%: .503
PER: 18.6 WS: 7.4

Playoffs
G:
14
PPG:
21.6 RPG: 9.9 APG: 3.0
SPG: 1.4 BPG: 1.1
FG%: .514 3PT%: N/A FT%: .694 TS%: .541
PER: 18.8 WS: 1.1

Team: 57–25 in regular season (3rd of 23 teams), 3–0 win over Nets in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–3 win over 76ers in Eastern Conference Semifinals, 4–0 loss to Celtics in Eastern Conference Finals

Honors: N/A

Resume: Played all 96 games and hit double-digits in scoring in 92 of them for the fourth-best offense in the league. Led the team in points, finishing just a smidge behind Sidney Moncrief in points per game. A consistent cog in a Big 4 (along with Moncrief and Paul Pressey, with Ricky Pierce as a super-sub) that won 57 games, and could have won more — the Bucks had the second-best point differential in the NBA and projected to win 62 based on their points scored/allowed profile. Cummings was a top-20 scorer and rebounder and rarely turned the ball over despite a team-high usage rate. Also ranked in the top-10 in the league in Defensive Rating and Defensive Win Shares.

Game of Note: In a Game 5 win in the second round against the 76ers (and Dr. J and Charles Barkley), piled up 23 points (on 7–13 shooting from the field and 9–10 at the line) along with 11 rebounds, six assists, two steals, and zero turnovers.

38. Giannis Antetokounmpo (2015–16)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
16.9 RPG: 7.7 APG: 4.3
SPG: 1.2 BPG: 1.4
FG%: .506 3PT%: .257 FT%: .724 TS%: .566
PER: 18.8 WS: 7.1

Playoffs
N/A

Honors: N/A

Team: 33–49 in regular season (22nd of 30 teams), missed playoffs

Resume: Four triple-doubles during a breakout run after All-Star Weekend, and one of the best players in the league during those couple months, using part of that time to rehearse as something along the lines of a point guard or point forward. One of the most dominant players in the world in transition, and turnd offensive possessions into his own little world of nearly perpetual semi-transition. Rapidly rounded the edges from his game and at age 21 quickly became not only the best player on the team, but the best player on the team at most things.

Game of Note: Dominated every facet of the game with 27/12/10 along with four steals and three blocks (and just one turnover) in a win over the Lakers.

37. Vin Baker (1996–97)

Regular Season
G:
78
PPG:
21.0 RPG: 10.3 APG: 2.7
SPG: 1.0 BPG: 1.4
FG%: .505 3PT%: .278 FT%: .687 TS%: .553
PER: 20.1 WS: 8.3

Playoffs
N/A

Honors: All-NBA 3rd Team, All-Star

Team: 33–49 in regular season (20th of 29 teams), missed playoffs

Resume: Made the top-15 in scoring (14th) and rebounding (7th), joining only Patrick Ewing and Karl Malone in that group. Fine company also on the All-NBA 3rd Team with John Stockton, Anfernee Hardaway, Anthony Mason, and Shaquille O’Neal. Wish we could talk about a playoff run here but this was a thin team (talking Sherman Douglas and Johnny Newman as fourth and fifth in minutes) outside of the young trio of Baker (25), Glenn Robinson (24), and Ray Allen (21).

Game of Note: Shot 13–13 from the field for 31 points along with eight boards and three assists in a 20-point win over Vlade Divac and Glen Rice (and Tony Smith, the local) and the 54-win Hornets.

36. Michael Redd (2003–04)

Regular Season
G:
82
PPG:
21.7 RPG: 5.0 APG: 2.3
SPG: 1.0 BPG: 0.1
FG%: .440 3PT%: .350 FT%: .868 TS%: .544
PER: 19.9 WS: 9.7

Playoffs
N/A

Honors: N/A

Team: 41–41 in regular season (14th of 30 teams), 4–1 loss to Pistons in Eastern Conference First Round

Resume: The Redd/Keith Van Horn (two leading scorers) Bucks ranked a couple spots ahead of the Kobe/Shaq (two leading scorers) Lakers (who lost to the Pistons in the Finals) in offensive efficiency, for some context. So yes, Redd was by far the best offensive player for 82 games on the fourth-best offensive team in the NBA, and that counts. That 35.0 percent mark from three was actually the lowest of his prime healthy seasons, but this was the season he took over the offense and started living at the line, and so he scored efficiently despite the relatively modest long-range numbers. Redd was never going to lead the Bucks deep through the playoffs without a fellow All-Star or two, but that is an indictment on the cast; and it’s not like he was just getting points on a bottom-dwelling team either.

Game of Note: Dropped 40/5/4 on the Magic in a win against Tracy McGrady and future Bucks such as (second-year) Drew Gooden and (rookie!) Zaza Pachulia as well as not-future Bucks such as Gordon Giricek and Lee Nailon.

35. Paul Pressey (1985–86)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
14.3 RPG: 5.0 APG: 7.8
SPG: 2.1 BPG: 0.9
FG%: .488 3PT%: .182 FT%: .806 TS%: .564
PER: 18.6 WS: 9.8

Playoffs
G:
14
PPG:
16.1 RPG: 4.3 APG: 7.9
SPG: 1.3 BPG: 0.9
FG%: .484 3PT%: .333 FT%: .761 TS%: .575
PER: 15.2 WS: 1.0

Team: 57–25 in regular season (3rd of 23 teams), 3–0 win over Nets in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–3 win over 76ers in Eastern Conference Semifinals, 4–0 loss to Celtics in Eastern Conference Finals

Honors: All-Defensive 1st Team

Resume: One of the great defensive players in the world on one of the great defensive teams in the league (second in efficiency). Career-best (and easily team-leading) 7.8 assists per game, and shows up on all sorts of advanced stats league leaderboards, like Defensive Rating (10th), Defensive Win Shares (6th), Box Plus/Minus (5th), and Value Over Replacement Player (5th). Made an appearance (13th) in MVP voting, too. Well-regarded in his day, Pressey looks even better now.

Game of Note: With the series tied 2–2 in the second round against the 76ers, Pressey hit for a triple-double (23/16/10) and a win on… seven shot attempts from the field in 47 minutes.

34. Khris Middleton (2017–18)

Regular Season
G:
82
PPG:
20.1 RPG: 5.2 APG: 4.0
SPG: 1.5 BPG: 0.3
FG%: .466 3PT%: .359 FT%: .884 TS%: .577
PER: 17.4 WS: 6.9

Playoffs
G:
7
PPG:
24.7 RPG: 5.1 APG: 3.1
SPG: 0.9 BPG: 0.7
FG%: .598 3PT%: .610 FT%: .737 TS%: .719
PER: 22.4 WS: 1.1

Honors: N/A

Team: 44–38 in regular season (15th of 30 teams), 4–3 loss to Celtics in Eastern Conference First Round

Resume: Look at those playoff shooting percentages. And that was over the course of seven games. We have to start with those playoff numbers, because Middleton was one of the best players of the first round. It followed a career-best regular season too, posting personal bests in points (20.1) and rebounds (5.2) per game while playing the second-most minutes in the NBA, behind only LeBron James.

Game of Note: Put together a 31/8/6 in Game 1 against the Celtics — a game he sent to overtime when the Bucks had 0.5 seconds to work with on an inbound and he hit a stunning 35-footer.

33. Paul Pressey (1984–85)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
16.1 RPG: 5.4 APG: 6.8
SPG: 1.6 BPG: 0.7
FG%: .517 3PT%: .350 FT%: .758 TS%: .577
PER: 17.6 WS: 9.6

Playoffs
G:
8
PPG:
15.3 RPG: 6.0 APG: 7.6
SPG: 2.3 BPG: 0.6
FG%: .511 3PT%: .333 FT%: .816 TS%: .583
PER: 16.6 WS: 0.6

Team: 59–23 in regular season (3rd of 23 teams), 3–1 win over Bulls in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–0 loss to 76ers in Eastern Conference Semifinals

Honors: All-Defensive 1st Team

Resume: A defensive ace (along with Sidney Moncrief) on the second-best defensive team in the NBA, and numbers back up what was seen so clearly to the eyes (to the eyes fortunate enough to see him play), as he ranked sixth in the league in Defensive Win Shares. He could play both sides of the ball, too: Pressey put up career-bests in points (16.1), rebounds (5.4), and True Shooting Percentage (.577) while leading the team in assists (6.8). The type of player and type of season that would make any good team in any era even better (far better, even), which he did.

Game of Note: The picture of efficiency with 29 points (13–18 from the field, 1–1 on threes, 2–2 at the line), seven rebounds, five assists, and three steals in a win over Michael Ray Richardson and the Nets.

32. Alvin Robertson (1990–91)

Regular Season
G:
81
PPG:
13.6 RPG: 5.7 APG: 5.5
SPG: 3.0 BPG: 0.2
FG%: .485 3PT%: .365 FT%: .757 TS%: .538
PER: 18.6 WS: 7.7

Playoffs
G:
3
PPG:
23.7 RPG: 6.0 APG: 5.0
SPG: 2.7 BPG: 0.0
FG%: .592 3PT%: .333 FT%: .769 TS%: .649
PER: 22.8 WS: 0.4

Team: 48–34 in regular season (10th of 27 teams)

Honors: All-Star, All-Defensive 1st Team

Resume: The story goes that the Bucks were one of the very good teams (if not better than very good) of the 1980s and then hit hard times throughout the entire 1990s before being saved in 2000–01 by The Big 3 of Ray Allen, Glenn Robinson, and Sam Cassell. Mostly true. Mostly! The Bucks snuck in a winning season (and not of the 42-win variety) to start the decade, one of the most overlooked teams in franchise history. And their most valuable player, their best all-around player? Alvin Robertson, a defensive standout who did a bit of everything on his way to top-20 league ranks in Defensive Rating (15th), Defensive Win Shares (14th), Box Plus/Minus (9th), and Value Over Replacement Player (10th). To go along with leading the league in steals and earning that All-Defensive 1st Team honor, his sixth straight (and final) season making one of the top two All-Defensive teams. And he could throw the ball in the hoop, too (see: playoff numbers).

Game of Note: Here, here is an Alvin Robertson line: 25 points (on 11–17 from the field), 16 rebounds, 12 assists, five steals, one block. In a day’s work in a day-after-Christmas 1990 win over the Run TMC (Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, Chris Mullin) Warriors.

31. Bob Dandridge (1975–76)

Regular Season
G:
73
PPG:
21.5 RPG: 7.4 APG: 2.8
SPG: 1.5 BPG: 0.5
FG%: .502 3PT%: N/A FT%: .824 TS%: .545
PER: 19.1 WS: 9.0

Playoffs
G:
3
PPG: 22.0 RPG: 7.7 APG: 2.7
SPG: 1.0 BPG: 0.0
FG%: .490 3PT%: N/A FT%: .900 TS%: .571
PER: 17.2 WS: 0.2

Honors: All-Star

Team: 38–44 in regular season (11th of 18 teams), 3–1 loss to Pistons in Western Conference First Round

Resume: Dandridge took over as top dog in the first post-Kareem season and his game evolved nicely, scoring a career-high 21.5 per game while getting to the line more than ever and converting at his best rate there, too. And the Bucks needed every one of his points; they went 2–12 when he scored 15 or fewer. He earned praise and got it, starting in the All-Star Game along with teammate Brian Winters (and former teammate, Kareem). Oddly, the Bucks won the Midwest Division and thereby secured the two seed in the conference in spite of their 38 wins, but lost in round one.

Game of Note: Went for 40 (on 17–22 shooting) in a win over the Kings. In fact, scored 38 against the Kings in his only other matchup against them that year. Enjoyed playing the Kings.

30. Terry Cummings (1988–89)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
22.9 RPG: 8.1 APG: 2.5
SPG: 1.3 BPG: 0.9
FG%: .467 3PT%: .467 FT%: .787 TS%: .518
PER: 19.7 WS: 7.7

Playoffs
G:
5
PPG: 12.8 RPG: 6.6 APG: 1.4
SPG: 0.6 BPG: 0.0
FG%: .362 3PT%: .000 FT%: .875 TS%: .421
PER: 15.4 WS: 0.0

Honors: All-NBA 3rd Team, All-Star

Team: 49–33 in regular season (8th of 25 teams), 3–2 win over Hawks in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–0 loss to Pistons in Eastern Conference Semifinals

Resume: The Bucks would have had the fourth-best mark in the Western Conference with that 49–33 record; as it was, they finished fourth in the Central Division, barely ahead of the 47-win Bulls for fifth. Cummings was the best player on a deep team that sported both a top-10 offense and defense. Ranked 11th in the league in scoring while carrying the offense more than ever, shot a career-best 78.7 % from the line, and even started to take some threes (though just a few, he was 7–15). Had an up-and-down series in the first round against the Hawks and missed the conference semifinals due to injury in his final year with the Bucks.

Game of Note: Beat the 52-win Knicks (a young edition of the Patrick Ewing/Charles Oakley/Mark Jackson Knicks) with 38 points (on 15–19 shooting from the field) and 10 rebounds along with a couple of assists and steals.

29. Marques Johnson (1977–78)

Regular Season
G:
80
PPG:
19.5 RPG: 10.6 APG: 2.4
SPG: 1.2 BPG: 1.3
FG%: .522 3PT%: N/A FT%: .736 TS%: .563
PER: 21.3 WS: 10.6

Playoffs
G:
9
PPG:
24.0 RPG: 12.4 APG: 3.4
SPG: 1.1 BPG: 1.9
FG%: .549 3PT%: N/A FT%: .750 TS%: .596
PER: 27.2 WS: 1.9

Honors: All-Rookie 1st Team

Team: 44–38 in regular season (8th of 22 teams), 2–0 win over Suns in Western Conference First Round, 4–3 loss to Nuggets in Western Conference Semifinals

Resume: Stepped onto an NBA court as a high-level scorer and rebounder (an elite offensive rebounder, in particular) playing for one of the fastest-paced teams in franchise history (fifth in the league and third in franchise history in terms of relative pace). While we are talking numbers: Made leaderboards as a rookie in advanced stats like Effective Field Goal Percentage (13th), Offensive Rebound Percentage (12th), Turnover Percentage (7th), Offensive Rating (3rd), Win Shares (9th), Box Plus/Minus (16th), and Value Over Replacement Player (15th). Runner-up (to a deserving Walter Davis) in Rookie of the Year voting, but also showed up on the MVP voting results. Reached new heights in an electric postseason, with that 27.2 PER along with leading everyone in the playoffs with an 18.4 rebound percentage and a 7.2 turnover percentage. After hitting for 32 once in 80 regular season games, Johnson eclipsed that three times in nine playoff games. Was on to things.

Game of Note: After dropping the first two games in Denver in the second round, came home to Milwaukee for Game 3 and dropped 35 in a 31-point win. Bucks put up a 143-spot (including 87 in the second half!) that night.

28. Glenn Robinson (2000–01)

Regular Season
G:
76
PPG:
22.0 RPG: 6.9 APG: 3.3
SPG: 1.1 BPG: 0.8
FG%: .468 3PT%: .299 FT%: .820 TS%: .525
PER: 20.1 WS: 6.7

Playoffs
G:
18
PPG: 19.4 RPG: 6.4 APG: 3.3
SPG: 0.6 BPG: 1.3
FG%: .429 3PT%: .387 FT%: .893 TS%: .505
PER: 16.9 WS: 1.2

Honors: All-Star

Team: 52–30 in regular season (7th of 30 teams), 3–1 win over Magic in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–3 win over Hornets in Eastern Conference Semifinals, 4–3 loss to 76ers in Eastern Conference Finals

Resume: Big Dog was the leading scorer (tied with Ray Allen at 22.0 per game) on the best offense in the NBA. Yes, the Bucks ranked as the most efficient offense in the league in the regular season, just ahead of a prime Shaq/Kobe (who both averaged 28+ per game) Lakers championship team. This was the second-best offense in Bucks history, not too far off from the 66-win title team in 1970–71. The focus here is on offense not because Robinson was not a defensive standout or because the Bucks were an average defensive team; the focus here is on offense because when you are a lead scorer (he hit double-digits in scoring in 93 of 94 games overall) on the best offense in the NBA and you almost make it to the Finals namely because of that offense, that is what matters most.

Game of Note: Dropped 45 on the Warriors (the Vonteego Cummings Years) on 18–27 from the field, 2–4 on threes, and 7–8 from the line. Plus seven rebounds and a couple of assists.

27. Ray Allen (2001–02)

Regular Season
G:
69
PPG:
21.8 RPG: 4.5 APG: 3.9
SPG: 1.3 BPG: 0.3
FG%: .462 3PT%: .434 FT%: .873 TS%: .598
PER: 21.6 WS: 8.9

Playoffs
N/A

Honors: All-Star

Team: 41–41 in regular season (17th of 29 teams), missed playoffs

Resume: Led the NBA in 3-pointers made (229) for the first time in his career (he did so three times overall), and made the second-most of his career. And he did this while shooting the best percentage from deep (.434) of his Milwaukee years. Following a brilliant 2000–01, took the offense into his hands more than ever, increasing his usage while turning the ball over less. Led the NBA in Offensive Box Plus/Minus. Still, his talented team (with the Big 3 of Allen, Sam Cassell, and Glenn Robinson intact along with a budding Michael Redd) disappointingly missed the playoffs; Anthony Mason played more than 500 minutes more than anyone on the Bucks during this season.

Game of Note: Dropped a career-high 47 points (along with four rebounds, three assists, and three steals) on 15–23 from the field, 7–10 from beyond the arc, and 7–7 from the line in a win on Milwaukee Day (4/14) over the Hornets.

26. Terry Cummings (1986–87)

Regular Season
G:
82
PPG:
20.8 RPG: 8.5 APG: 2.8
SPG: 1.6 BPG: 1.0
FG%: .511 3PT%: .000 FT%: .662 TS%: .536
PER: 20.5 WS: 8.8

Playoffs
G:
12
PPG:
22.3 RPG: 7.9 APG: 2.3
SPG: 1.0 BPG: 1.1
FG%: .488 3PT%: N/A FT%: .687 TS%: .531
PER: 18.4 WS: 1.0

Honors: N/A

Team: 50–32 in regular season (6th of 23 teams), 3–2 win over 76ers in Eastern Conference First Round, 4–3 loss to Celtics in Eastern Conference Semifinals

Resume: Helped lead the Bucks to a rare playoff series win over the 76ers (the 76ers of Charles Barkley). Ranked in the top-30 in the league in traditional stats like points (25th), rebounds (27th), and steals (19th) as well as advanced stats like PER (13th), Box Plus/Minus (16th), and Value Over Replacement Player (18th). Went for 26 and 13 on my first birthday and was liable to do the same on yours.

Game of Note: Put up 39/15/10 and six steals yet somehow lost to Mark Aguirre and the Mavericks.

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