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The first two games are in the books and now the series shifts to Oracle Arena for Games 3 and 4. Warriors bloggers Ben Cruz (Bleacher Report), Rich Twu (Golden State of Mind), Adam Lauridsen (Fast Break), Ethan Sherwood Strauss (WarriorsWorld & ESPN.com) and Steve Berman (Bay Area Sports Guy) discuss their take on the series so far in answering the questions below.

What has been the biggest surprise through the first two games of the Warriors-Nuggets series?

Ben Cruz | Bleacher Report | @cruzkontrol
The biggest surprise of the series so far has been Golden State's inability to keep Andre Miller in check. Yes, that Andre Miller. Miller is a solid role player for the Nuggets and has been a very consistent player throughout his 14-year career but what the Warriors are allowing him to do on the court thus far is mind-boggling. He's posted 28 and 18 points respectively in games 1 and 2 and it's really hard to pinpoint exactly why. He's far from the most athletic guy on Denver's roster and is easily the oldest. Of all the players the Nuggets have, Miller was probably one of the last guys Mark Jackson imagined keeping him up at night. George Karl will likely turn to Miller a lot more for the rest of the series so the Warriors need to figure out quickly how they can keep him at bay. It was expected that Ty Lawson, Andre Iguodala and even a hobbled Kenneth Faried would cause Golden State problems but instead, it's the elder statesman of the group that has been the most frustrating and the Warriors need to remedy that quickly.

Rich Twu | Golden State of Mind | @poormanscommish
I would still have to say that, for me, Andre Miller's fall-away baseline jumpers as part of his 18-point fourth quarter in Game 1 was the proverbial wrench bonking my head from left field.

Adam Lauridsen | Fast Break | @GSWFastBreak
The number of wide-open shots for Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Harrison Barnes. The Warriors are doing an excellent job setting screens and moving without the ball, but I expected Denver to do a better job physically defending Curry. He's struggled at times this season when a bigger, stronger defender can hang all over him. So far, the Nuggets haven't been able to manage that. Give some credit to the Warriors' sets, but I worry a lot of the issue is simply Denver's effort and defensive execution. After the shock of losing on their home court, I expect to see the Nuggets do a better job in Game 3.

Ethan Sherwood Strauss | WarriorsWorld | @SherwoodStrauss
Anthony Randolph is getting big playoff minutes, against the Warriors of all teams. I'm not certain how to process this, as I'm not sure how to process his offensive effectiveness on Tuesday night. In any event, we were treated to a vintage Warriors game: Anthony Randolph excited the masses and his team got trounced.

Steve Berman | Bay Area Sports Guy | @BASportsGuy
After he missed some games and didn't seem all that mobile in the last game of the regular season, it's shocking how much impact Andrew Bogut has had on this series. Over the series' first two games the Warriors are allowing 27.4 fewer points per 100 possessions when he's on the floor. He wasn't needed to fill the offensive void left by David Lee in Game 2 as much as I figured, because the Warriors' perimeter players shot insanely well. But even though he got whistled for a couple moving screens early on in Game 2, a legitimate screen caused Andre Iguodala to hit the floor later. The Nuggets are stocked with solid NBA players, but Bogut is the only guy on either side physically punishing people. It's hard to remember the last time any Warriors played with a style as imposing as Bogut has shown lately, let alone combined with his shot-blocking capabilities.

Warriors rookie Harrison Barnes will take the court for Game 3 on Friday after scoring a career-high 24 points in Game 2 on Tuesday. (photo: Rocky Widner/NBAE/Getty)
How does David Lee’s injury affect this series?

Ben Cruz | Bleacher Report | @cruzkontrol
Lee's absence on the court doesn't negatively affect the Warriors as many think it will (Carl Landry is a more than capable replacement). While Golden State would love to have their lone All-Star suited up and ready to go, his injury has freed up Stephen Curry on the offensive end even more so than before. Curry plays a different game when he and Lee share the floor and rightfully so. The pick-and-roll threat that the duo possesses causes all sorts of headaches for the defense. With that, it turns Curry into more of a traditional point guard and in turn, he looks to score less. Without Lee, the burden of scoring falls even more on the sniper out of Davidson - a burden he is more than willing to take on. Game 2 was not the first time that Curry showed he could make it rain from all over the court without his co-captain. Remember in late February when Curry put on a show dropping 54 points in Madison Square Garden? David Lee was sidelined for that game as well. Obviously Game 2 and that historic night in New York are a small sample size but the lack of Lee does change the way Curry plays and it just might be for the better.

Rich Twu | Golden State of Mind | @poormanscommish
It's made the Warriors a more agile team without much side effect, but only because the Nuggets don't have a post presence. Lee's replacement in Jarrett Jack also solves the problem for the Warriors of the double-teaming and fatigue of Stephen Curry. Furthermore, with Harrison Barnes moving to the 4, it's created a mismatch on the offensive end for the Dubs, which for example allowed The Black Falcon to "YouTube-ize" (no one buys posters anymore) Anthony Randolph.

Adam Lauridsen | Fast Break | @GSWFastBreak
Offensively, it reduces the Warriors options. They are now almost exclusively a jump-shooting team, unless Harrison Barnes can slash to the basket. Barnes succeeded in Game 2 -- and was the x-factor in the Warriors' win -- but at some point they're going to miss the reliable, high-percentage points from the Curry/Lee pick-and-roll. Lee also quarterbacked the offense when Curry was pressured. He was an escape valve, able to take the dump-off pass and find the open man created by a sagging defense or double-team. The Warriors will miss his court-vision in those circumstances. Defensively, Lee's absence is either no factor or helps the Warriors. Barnes at 4 is better equipped to chase Chandler around the floor. If the Nuggets go big with Faried at the 4 spot, Landry or Barnes will be just as well equipped as Lee to handle him.

Ethan Sherwood Strauss | WarriorsWorld | @SherwoodStrauss
It's obviously unfortunate, and it makes GSW a less powerful team. At the same time, they can benefit from playing Harrison Barnes at power forward, something they've been reluctant to do this season. A spread floor with four-three-point shooters could add a scary dimension to the Warriors offense, one they'll be able to access next season when David Lee comes back. In the right here and now, the better spacing will do much to open up driving lanes for Barnes and Jarrett Jack.

Steve Berman | Bay Area Sports Guy | @BASportsGuy
Game 3 will be the test. If the Warriors come out fast, score freely and run Denver out of Oracle Arena, we can assume they'll be fine – through this series, at least – unless someone else gets hurt. However, we haven't seen how the Warriors will avoid long scoring droughts if/when the outside shots aren't falling. Lee kept the offense from getting stagnant in those situations by either creating something off the dribble and scoring with either hand down low. The Warriors should be fine on the other end without Lee as long as their best defensive players (Andrew Bogut, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green) stay out of foul trouble. Did they play so well in Game 2 because they played out of their heads in response to the heightened emotions caused by Lee's injury and everybody's changing roles, or is this sustainable? The Warriors moved the ball tremendously in Game 2, a habit they should stick to regardless of whether Lee is healthy or not. If they can remember how they won Game 2 and continue playing that way, there's no reason why they can't win the series.


Stay tuned for more from this 'Bloggers Roundtable' throughout the postseason, and access prior discussions among this group by clicking here.

RECENT BLOGGERS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS

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