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Free Agency Preview Part IV: Shooting Guards

Taking a detailed look at the best shooting guards available this summer

HOUSTON - While the NBA playoffs are heating up, the Rockets are busy getting ready for what promises to be an offseason full of intrigue and great expectations. Armed with a pair of first-round draft picks and a significant amount of financial flexibility, General Manager Daryl Morey and company figure to have options galore this summer when contemplating ways to improve the team and put the franchise on the path to championship contention.

While there’s no way to divine what the next few months may bring in terms of player acquisition -- it’s always a good idea to remember that Morey’s moves have, by and large, come out of the blue and caught most everyone unaware -- there’s no better time than the present to get acquainted (or in some cases, reacquainted) with the names that figure to loom large this summer.

We’ll tackle the draft in greater detail once the selection order is finalized following the lottery drawing May 30. For now, we’re taking a look at some of the free agents who will be on the radar screen of the Rockets and the other 29 teams in the league once the clock strikes midnight July 1.

What follows is a statistical and subjective breakdown of some of the shooting guards who are hitting the open market this summer (click here for Part 1 in which we examined the market for centers, here for Part 2 for a look at the top power forwards available, and here for Part 3and a glimpse at the small forward crop). Return to Rockets.com in the days that follow for analysis of the talent available at the other positions. (shot location statistics courtesy ofhoopdata.com; Synergy stats courtesy of Synergy Sports Technology)

Eric Gordon (RFA):

The basics: 20.6 ppg, 3.4 apg, 2.8 rpg, 1.4 spg, .450 FG%, .250 3-PT%, .754 FT%, 19.23 PER

Advanced stats (from 2010-11): 4.5 rebound rate (65th among qualifying SGs), 6.6 defensive rebound rate (68th), 2.5 offensive rebound rate (28th), 16.3 assist rate (30th), 10.1 turnover rate (49th)

Shooting percentages by location (from 2010-11): At rim: 64.8% (SGs averaged 63.2% from that distance in ’11-‘12), 3-9 feet: 33.1%, (SG average: 37.5%), 10-15 feet: 38.6% (SG average: 40%), 16-23 feet: 38% (SG average: 38.9%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats (from 2010-11): Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler: .944 points per possession (90th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.143 ppp (87th percentile), Transition: 1.201 ppp (57th percentile), Isolations: .752 ppp (40th percentile), Off screen: .935 ppp (62nd percentile), Hand-offs: 1.085 ppp (79th percentile)

Defense (from 2010-11): Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .836 ppp (47th percentile), Spot-ups: .81 ppp (90th percentile), Isolation: .629 ppp (91st percentile), Off screen: .851 ppp (59th percentile)

Gordon is certain to be one of the more highly sought after free agents this summer, but it also seems just as certain that he’ll be staying put in New Orleans, especially now that the Hornets are also armed with the No. 1 pick in the upcoming NBA draft. Truth be told, it was always a long shot that the 23-year-old would bolt the Big Easy; given his status as the centerpiece of the Hornets’ part of the deal that sent Chris Paul to the Clippers, it was pretty hard to believe New Orleans would allow Gordon, a restricted free agent, to escape for nothing less than one year after having acquired his services. Simply put, Gordon possesses the potential to be one of the best two-guards in the league; he can stroke it from long range, create magic off the pick-and-roll, and draw fouls by the bushel. Add in the fact that he’s also a pretty darn good defender and you’ve got the makings of a future All-Star -- provided he can stay healthy, of course (Gordon has missed significant time due to injury in each of the last three seasons).

Ray Allen (UFA)

The basics: 14.2 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 2.4 apg, .458 FG%, .915 FT%, .453 3-PT%, 14.83 PER

Advanced stats: 5.3 rebound rate (62nd among qualifying SGs), 9.2 defensive rebound rate (53rd), 1.1 offensive rebound rate (72nd), 15.2 assist rate (43rd), 9.5 turnover rate (27th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 68.8%, 3-9 feet: 35.3%, 10-15 feet: 40.9%, 16-23 feet: 36%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Off screen: 1.08 ppp (81st percentile), Spot-ups: 1.304 ppp (98th percentile), Transition: 1.253 ppp (68th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .543 ppp (11th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .878 ppp (66th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .603 ppp (88th percentile), Off screens: .735 ppp (79th percentile), Isolations: .63 ppp (84th percentile)

Shooters don’t come more pure than Ray Allen, a surefire Hall of Famer and the NBA’s all-time record holder for three-pointers made. Even at 36 years of age (and he’ll be 37 by the time next season rolls around), Allen can still provide floor spacing with the best of them, knocking down jumpers with that picture perfect stroke put to good use in transition, peeling off of screens or simply by finding those open pockets of space in his team’s half-court sets. There’s great value in that to be sure, but keep in mind that’s about all you’re getting from him at this point in his career; the 16-year pro does not rebound and though his defensive metrics are solid, keep in mind that they are significantly buoyed by playing on one of the truly dominant defensive units in the league.

O.J. Mayo (RFA)

The basics: 12.6 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 2.6 apg, .408 FG%, .773 FT%, .364 3-PT%, 14.76 PER

Advanced stats: 6.9 rebound rate (30th among qualifying SGs), 12.1 defensive rebound rate (20th), 1.9 offensive rebound rate (47th), 15.3 assist rate (40th), 11.2 turnover rate (56th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 57.3%, 3-9 feet: 36.8%, 10-15 feet: 20.5%, 16-23 feet: 40%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: .989 ppp (65th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .718 ppp (44th percentile), Transition: .969 ppp (21st percentile), Isolations: .866 ppp (79th percentile), Off screens: .921 ppp (55th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.055 ppp (21st percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .798 ppp (45th percentile), Isolations: .814 ppp (44th percentile), Off-screen: 1222. ppp (5th percentile)

O.J. Mayo is a good player, but it’s probably time to cast aside any remaining notions of him becoming a great one at any point in the future. The No. 3 overall pick in the 2008 draft, Mayo’s destiny appears to be that of a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none type player. He’s a good shooter from distance, but his lack of explosion and burst leave him below average as a finisher around the rim. He can slide over and provide some quality minutes at point guard in a pinch, but he’s merely average as a passer and playmaker. Defensively, meanwhile, Mayo has his moments but is still largely mediocre in general, and it’s at least a little troubling that his Synergy numbers are so subpar despite the fact he plied his trade on one of the better defensive teams in the NBA this year.

Jamal Crawford (UFA -- Player Option)

The basics (2010-11 stats): 14.0 ppg, 3.2 apg, 2.0 rpg, .384 FG%, .927 FT%, .308 3-PT%, 15.8 PER

Advanced stats: 4.3 rebound rate (79th among qualifying SGs), 7.5 defensive rebound rate (75th), 1.1 offensive rebound rate (72nd), 16.9 assist rate (35th), 9.8 turnover rate (33rd)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 54.2%, 3-9 feet: 28.2%, 10-15 feet: 38.1%, 16-23 feet: 42%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Isolation: .941 ppp (90th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.074 ppp (83rd percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .688 ppp (34th percentile), Transition: .798 ppp (8th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .758 ppp (60th percentile), Spot-ups: .93 ppp (51st percentile), Isolations: .889 ppp (27th percentile), Off-screens: 1.053 ppp (22nd percentile)

Jamal Crawford has earned his reputation as a shoot-first combo guard in the mold of Dallas’ Jason Terry and, as Terry has repeatedly demonstrated, there is definitely a place for such players in this league. What becomes problematic, however, is when those same shoot-first combo guards forget how to, well … shoot, which is exactly what happened to Crawford this past season in Portland. The 32-year-old recorded his poorest field goal percentage since his rookie season and made matters worse by shooting a career worst from beyond the arc as well. One assumes that the 12-year pro will be able to bounce back to something more approaching his career norms going forward and, if he is able to do so, will be a quality addition (at the right price, of course) to any team looking for instant offense off the bench. Just keep in mind that offense is quite literally all you’re getting from Crawford since he doesn’t rebound or play much in the way of defense.

Lou Williams (UFA)

The basics: 14.9 ppg, 3.5 apg, 2.4 rpg, .407 FG%, .812 FT%, .362 3-PT%, 20.22 PER

Advanced stats: 5.1 rebound rate (69th among qualifying SGs), 8.3 defensive rebound rate (68th), 2.0 offensive rebound rate (44th), 18.4 assist rate (27th), 5.9 turnover rate (3rd)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 54%, 3-9 feet: 37%, 10-15 feet: 35.6%, 16-23 feet: 41%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler: .979 ppp (93rd percentile), Isolations: .913 ppp (87th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.025 ppp (72nd percentile), Transition: 1.216 ppp (62nd percentile), Hand-offs: .81 ppp (45th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball-handler: .8 ppp (44th percentile), Spot-ups: .911 ppp (56th percentile), Isolations: .636 ppp (83rd percentile), Off-screen: 1.12 ppp (13th percentile)

If Jamal Crawford is Jason Terry-esque then Lou Williams may very well be considered Terry 2.0. The 25-year-old combo guard is lethal off the pick-and-roll and in isolation situations as his Synergy numbers show. What the stats don’t reveal, however, is a shot fake that ranks among the game’s very best, and Williams isn’t bashful about using it in order to earn his fair share of trips to the charity stripe. Listed at 6-1, 175 pounds, Williams doesn’t have the size to defend twos so he needs to be paired with a bigger backcourt mate to help out defensively. The seventh-year pro also can’t be expected to help out at all on the glass. But with his cat-like quickness and playmaking instincts, Williams can be a dynamic player in the right situation, especially given that he is entering the prime years of his basketball career.

Jason Terry (UFA)

The basics: 15.1 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 3.6 apg, .430 FG%, .883 FT%, .378 3-PT%, 15.8 PER

Advanced stats: 4.2 rebound rate (81st among qualifying SGs), 7.4 defensive rebound rate (76th), .9 offensive rebound rate (79th), 18.3 assist rate (27th), 10.3 turnover rate (40th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 68%, 3-9 feet: 40%, 10-15 feet: 40.2%, 16-23 feet: 43%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler: .86 ppp (78th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.173 ppp (93rd percentile), Transition: .904 ppp (15th percentile), Isolations: .814 ppp (65th percentile), Off-screens: .865 ppp (42nd percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .82 ppp (79th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .815 ppp (39th percentile), Isolations: .755 ppp (58th percentile), Off screens: .979 ppp (35th percentile)

With all the talk of Jason Terry, we’d be remiss if we didn’t point out the fact that the original is on the open market this summer as well. Much to their chagrin, Rockets fans are all too familiar with what the 13-year pro brings to the table: unbridled confidence, clever playmaking, and shot-making that, sadly, seemingly borders on the sublime whenever he faces the Rockets. Terry will be 35-years-old by the time next season begins so his best years are unquestionably behind him, but even in the dotage of his basketball career he remains one of the more effective bench sparkplugs in the game.

Delonte West (UFA)

The basics: 9.6 ppg, 3.2 apg, 2.3 rpg, .461 FG%, .886 FT%, .355 3-PT%, 15.35 PER

Advanced stats: 5.4 rebound rate (58th among qualifying SGs), 9.2 defensive rebound rate (53rd), 1.4 offensive rebound rate (64th), 22.9 assist rate (10th), 12.5 turnover rate (70th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 59.6%, 3-9 feet: 32%, 10-15 feet: 53.2%, 16-23 feet: 42%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler: .835 ppp (72nd percentile), Isolations: .92 ppp (88th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.08 ppp (84th percentile), Transition: 1.083 ppp (39th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .62 ppp (85th percentile), Spot-ups: .861 ppp (70th percentile), Isolations: 1.057 ppp (6th percentile), Off screens: .821 ppp (63rd percentile)

Terry’s occasional backcourt mate in Dallas this past season, West is a solid, if not spectacular, option on the combo guard market this summer. The eight-year pro has been injury prone throughout his career, but when healthy he’s frequently been a consistent contributor on both ends of the floor at every stop along the way of his hoops journey. He can handle the ball, shoot from distance and smartly set up his teammates (though he does turn the ball over far too often). West is also a handy defensive player who has a knack for effectively getting under the skin of players larger than he is. His well-documented battle with bipolar behavior is an issue to be considered, but the 28-year-old West has done well to keep it in check and has shown himself quite capable of being a reliable and well-respected teammate.

Courtney Lee (RFA)

The basics: 11.4 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 1.5 apg, .433 FG%, .826 FT%, .401 3-PT%, 12.61 PER

Advanced stats: 5.2 rebound rate (66th among qualifying SGs), 8.9 defensive rebound rate (61st), 1.7 offensive rebound rate (52nd), 11.4 assist rate (63rd), 8.3 turnover rate (16th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 62.6%, 3-9 feet: 34%, 10-15 feet: 34.2%, 16-23 feet: 37%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: 1.066 ppp (81st percentile), Transition: 1.205 ppp (60th percentile), Pick-and-roll roll ball handler: .611 ppp (21st percentile)
Isolations: .758 ppp (52nd percentile), Off-screens: .706 ppp (19th percentile), Hand-offs: 625 ppp (25th),

Defense: Spot-ups: .89 ppp (63rd percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball-handler: .876 ppp (27th percentile), Isolations: .759 ppp (57th percentile), Off screens: .718 ppp (82nd percentile), Post-ups: 1.047 ppp (15th percentile)

Lee has become a fan favorite during his two-year stint in Houston, earning that affection with his energy, athleticism and silky smooth style (both on and off the court). The fourth-year pro has also proven himself to be remarkably consistent; he came into the league as a terrific spot-up shooter and excellent wing defender and Lee has not allowed either aspect of his game to slip. He was second in the league in corner treys made (50) this past season, shooting them at a clip of 48.5 percent. And Lee showed his defensive worth on a nearly nightly basis as well, chasing around ones and twos with equal aplomb. He can be overmatched at times by some of the league’s bigger wings and he doesn’t draw fouls at a rate that comes close to taking advantage of his strong shooting stroke from the charity stripe, but three-point shooters who can defend will always have value in this league and, at just 26 years of age, Lee figures to be doing plenty of both for years to come.

J.R. Smith (UFA -- Player Option)

The basics: 12.5 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 2.4 apg, .407 FG%, .709 FT%, .347 3-PT%, 15.27 PER

Advanced stats: 8.1 rebound rate (12th among qualifying SGs), 12.9 defensive rebound rate (11th), 3.4 offensive rebound rate (16th), 15.0 assist rate (44th), 8.2 turnover rate (14th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 65%, 3-9 feet: 24.1%, 10-15 feet: 46.2%, 16-23 feet: 41%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Isolations: .728 ppp (41st percentile), Spot-ups: 1.146 ppp (92nd percentile), Transition: 1.317 ppp (80th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .743 ppp (51st percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.125 ppp (12th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .558 ppp (93rd percentile), Isolations: 1.0 ppp (9th percentile), Off screens: 1.143 ppp (10th percentile)

Smith is prone to making awful decisions, taking terrible shots and playing next to no defense. He’s also an elite athlete, a superb finisher and a shooter with unlimited range. That, in essence, is the roller coaster teams must ride with J.R. Smith, easily one of the most enigmatic players in the entire league. If consistency is what you’re after, Smith is most definitely not your guy. But any team searching for scoring punch will have to give the 26-year-old eighth-year pro a long, hard look because few can light it up quite the way Smith can.

Brandon Rush (RFA)

The basics: 9.8 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 1.4 apg, .501 FG%, .793 FT%, .452 3-PT%, 15.25 PER

Advanced stats: 8.3 rebound rate (10th among qualifying SGs), 14.4 defensive rebound rate (5th), 2.2 offensive rebound rate (39th), 13.3 assist rate (57th), 10.3 turnover rate (40th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 67.2%, 3-9 feet: 32.4%, 10-15 feet: 53.8%, 16-23 feet: 45%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: 1.222 ppp (95th percentile), Transition: 1.261 ppp (70th percentile), Isolations: .867 ppp (80th percentile), Off-screens: .8 ppp (29th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .969 ppp (92nd percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .925 ppp (53rd percentile), Isolations: .886 ppp (27th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .85 ppp (31st percentile), Post-ups: .765 ppp (65th percentile), Off screens: .78 ppp (72nd percentile)

Because he played for the once again woeful Warriors, few seem to have noticed the rather impressive season Brandon Rush enjoyed in 2011-12. He’s always been an excellent three-point shooter, but he took it to another level this year, posting a 45.2 percent conversation from beyond the arc. What’s more, he also posted career high rebound and assist rates as well, finally putting his quality size and athleticism to good use. Sign of things to come or simply a contract year push? Obviously only time will tell but Rush has the potential to be a significantly better and more impactful player than fellow floor spacers such as Steve Novak and, because he played in relative anonymity this year, a potentially cheaper one as well.

Danny Green (RFA)

The basics: 9.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 1.3 apg, .442 FG%, .790 FT%, .436 3-PT%, 15.55 PER

Advanced stats: 8.6 rebound rate (7th among qualifying SGs), 12.9 defensive rebound rate (11th), 4.2 offensive rebound rate (7th), 12.8 assist rate (60th), 9.9 turnover rate (36th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 58%, 3-9 feet: 23.9%, 10-15 feet: 30.4%, 16-23 feet: 41%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: 1.108 ppp (88th percentile), Transition: 1.355 ppp (87th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .593 ppp (19th percentile), Isolations: .737 ppp (44th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .915 ppp (18th percentile), Spot-ups: .976 ppp (38th percentile), Isolations: Off screens: .958 ppp (15th percentile), Off screens: 1.143 ppp (10th percentile)

Green might have been largely unknown during the regular season, but the part he’s played in the Spurs’ epic postseason run has likely eradicated much of the anonymity he previously enjoyed. A terrific spot-up shooter who rebounds well for his position and can play spot minutes at point guard in a pinch, Green has both surprised and impressed while becoming one of the key cogs of the San Antonio machine this season. As his Synergy numbers suggest, he’s still got work to do on the defensive end, but anyone who watched him play solid defense against the likes of Chris Paul during the Western Conference Semifinals could see that the third-year pro has the potential to become an asset on that end as well.

Gerald Green (UFA)

The basics: 12.9 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 1.1 apg, .481 FG%, .754 FT%, .391 3-PT%, 15.88 PER

Advanced stats: 8.0 rebound rate (14th among qualifying SGs), 14.2 defensive rebound rate (6th), 2.2 offensive rebound rate (39th), 7.8 assist rate (79th), 12.6 turnover rate (72nd)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 70.7%, 3-9 feet: 64.3%, 10-15 feet: 44.8%, 16-23 feet: 41%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: 1.13 ppp (91st percentile), Transition: 1.226 ppp (64th percentile), Post-ups: .98 ppp (91st percentile), Isolations: .975 ppp (81st percentile), Hand-offs: .867 ppp (55th percentile) Off screens: .938 ppp (60th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.132 ppp (11th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .815 ppp (39th percentile), Isolations: .622 ppp (86th percentile), Off screens: .972 ppp (36th percentile)

There was a time when you could simply show a highlight like this and that would be all you need to know about Gerald Green’s game. No longer, it would seem. After a two-year exile from the NBA, Green began to tap into his potential this season after getting a call-up to the New Jersey Nets midway through the 2011-12 season. Green was terrific offensively, scoring in a variety of ways with a surprising degree of efficiency. Green always had the otherworldly athletic ability, excellent size for his position and good outside touch, but during his first stint in the league those talents were best showcased in exhibitions and dunk contests rather than real games. Now armed with a rudimentary knowledge of the team concept, however, Green once again looms as a prospect with a highly intriguing future.

Shannon Brown (UFA)

The basics: 11.0 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 1.2 apg, .420 FG%, .808 FT%, .362 3-PT%, 13.68 PER

Advanced stats: 6.3 rebound rate (37th among qualifying SGs), 9.5 defensive rebound rate (48th), 3.1 offensive rebound rate (21st), 8.9 assist rate (77th), 8.3 turnover rate (16th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 66.9%, 3-9 feet: 22.7%, 10-15 feet: 27.3%, 16-23 feet: 35%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: .873 ppp (45th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .766 ppp (54th percentile), Transition: 1.129 ppp (46th percentile), Isolations: .738 ppp (45th percentile), Off-screens: .894 ppp (49th percentile), Cuts: 1.477 ppp (92nd percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.066 ppp (19th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .798 ppp (45th percentile), Off screens: .783 ppp (71st percentile), Isolations: .867 ppp (32nd percentile)

Like Gerald Green, Shannon Brown is a high flyer with a knack for the spectacular. But whereas Green still has a certain amount of upside that can perhaps be projected and tapped into due to his significant improvement this season, Brown is much more of a known entity at this point. He is what is: a solid performer who can contribute off the bench on both ends of the floor. Brown isn’t great at any one thing outside of throwing down thunderous dunks, but neither is he a liability in any area either, and when filling out a roster there’s certainly something to be said for having players who can be counted on for consistent contribution and effort night in and night out.

Landry Fields (RFA)

The basics: 8.8 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 2.6 apg, .460 FG%, .562 FT%, .256 3-PT%, 12.07 PER

Advanced stats: 8.5 rebound rate (8th among qualifying SGs), 13.5 defensive rebound rate (8th), 3.6 offensive rebound rate (12th), 20.0 assist rate (19th), 12.1 turnover rate (67th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 64.8%, 3-9 feet: 30.8%, 10-15 feet: 40.5%, 16-23 feet: 31%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: .75 ppp (27th percentile), Transition: 1.114 ppp (45th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .667 ppp (31st percentile), Cuts: 1.203 ppp (55th percentile), Isolations: .762 ppp (54th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .94 ppp (49th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .946 ppp (11th percentile), Isolations: .843 ppp (36th percentile), Off-screens: .924 ppp (44th percentile)

Fields followed up an impressive debut season with a dud during his sophomore campaign leaving many to wonder precisely what his future has in store. The biggest reason for Fields’ drop-off in productivity is obvious enough to see; his three-point shot completely abandoned him, effectively rendering him useless on the offensive end for a Knicks team in desperate need of shooters to space the floor. The Stanford product is a tremendous rebounder for his position but he’ll be hard pressed to receive much in the way of playing time going forward, regardless of where he plies his trade, if he doesn’t rediscover his shooting touch, cut down on his turnovers and improve on the defensive end of the floor.

Rudy Fernandez (RFA)

The basics: 8.6 ppg, 2.4 apg, 2.1 rpg, .440 FG%, .698 FT%, .328 3-PT%, 13.32 PER

Advanced stats: 5.3 rebound rate (62nd among qualifying SGs), 8.9 defensive rebound rate (61st), 1.5 offensive rebound rate (60th), 20.9 assist rate (13th), 11.1 turnover rate (54th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 80%, 3-9 feet: 40%, 10-15 feet: 61.5%, 16-23 feet: 43%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: .781 ppp (31st percentile), Transition: 1.724 ppp (99th percentile), Off-screens: 1.019 ppp (74th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.043 ppp (24th percentile), Isolations: .767 ppp (55th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .758 ppp (60th percentile), Off screens: 1.143 ppp (10th percentile)

Once considered a highly promising young prospect, Fernandez has seen his NBA stock plummet ever since he failed to build on his impressive rookie season. The 27-year-old Spaniard can make plays off the dribble and is excellent in transition (Denver’s high octane attack seemed to suit his preferred playing style), but his average shooting and allergy to attacking the glass make him appear to be little more than an NBA role player now. Defensively, he’s quick enough to be able to check opposing point guards when the need arises, but bigger wings can absolutely overwhelm him due to his slight build. 

Tracy McGrady (UFA)

The basics: 5.3 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 2.1 apg, .437 FG%, .675 FT%, .455 3-PT%, 13.69 PER

Advanced stats: 10.8 rebound rate (2nd among qualifying SGs), 18.2 defensive rebound rate (2nd), 3.3 offensive rebound rate (18th), 25.6 assist rate (6th), 12.3 turnover rate (68th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 62.1%, 3-9 feet: 55.6%, 10-15 feet: 29.4%, 16-23 feet: 31%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Post-ups: .866 ppp (68th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.052 ppp (78th percentile), Isolations: .673 ppp (31st percentile), Transition: 1.086 ppp (40th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .7 ppp (40th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.016 ppp (31st percentile), Off screens: 1.0 ppp (29th percentile),
Isolations: .727 ppp (65th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .667 ppp (79th percentile)

Now in the twilight of his career, McGrady bears little resemblance to the two-time scoring champion who once laid claim to being one of the five greatest players on the planet. These days the 33-year-old T-Mac is much more ground bound, using his considerable basketball IQ to pick his spots when his body allows him to take advantage of them. McGrady can still pass -- he’ll likely be the best passer in the gym when he’s 85 -- so he can come in and play some back-up point guard every now and then, and he’s still got extraordinary length; an asset he parlayed into posting a career-high rebounding rate this past season. And though he’s not spry and therefore unable to be effective on the defensive end if he’s forced to chased his assignment all over the floor, his aforementioned intelligence and length still help him hold his own on that end of the court when the matchup is right.

Nick Young (UFA)

The basics: 14.2 ppg, 2.1 rpg, .9 apg, .403 FG%, .852 FT%, .365 3-PT%, 12.93 PER

Advanced stats: 4.4 rebound rate (78th among qualifying SGs), 6.8 defensive rebound rate (79th), 2.0 offensive rebound rate (44th), 5.6 assist rate (82nd), 8.3 turnover rate (16th)

Shooting percentages by location (with Clippers): At rim: 51.6%, 3-9 feet: 37.5%, 10-15 feet: 21.1%, 16-23 feet: 45%

Noteworthy Synergy stats (with Clippers): Offense: Spot-ups: 1.042 ppp (77th percentile), Transition: .8 ppp (8th percentile), Isolations: .974 ppp (92nd percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .69 ppp (35th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .925 ppp (53rd percentile), Isolations: .645 ppp (81st percentile), Off screens: .87 ppp (54th percentile)

If one were able to hook Nick Young up to a machine, Matrix style, and simply download an advanced basketball course into his brain then you might really have something (of course, the same could be said for many a young player in this league). As it is, Young is a black hole of a scoring guard who doesn’t pass, doesn’t rebound and rarely defends despite possessing the physical tools to do at least a decent job at both. As a catch-and-shoot or isolation option, Young can do damage. What his next team will hopefully convince him of, however, is that he has the ability to be so much more.

Randy Foye (UFA)

The basics: 11.0 ppg, 2.1 rpg, 2.2 apg, .398 FG%, .859 FT%, .386 3-PT%, 13.56 PER

Advanced stats: 4.9 rebound rate (71st among qualifying SGs), 8.1 defensive rebound rate (70th), 1.7 offensive rebound rate (52nd), 16.2 assist rate (36th), 8.1 turnover rate (13th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 61%, 3-9 feet: 22.9%, 10-15 feet: 44.8%, 16-23 feet: 32%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: 1.029 ppp (73rd percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .83 ppp (71st percentile), Transition: 1.315 ppp (79th percentile), Isolations: .73 ppp (42nd percentile), Off-screens: .694 ppp (18th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: 1.074 ppp (18th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .891 ppp (24th percentile), Isolations: .792 ppp (49th percentile), Off screens: .754 ppp (76th percentile)

Randy Foye quietly enjoyed a quality season with the Clippers this past season, knocking down a pair of treys per game thanks to his 38.6 percent three-point shooting (and, one suspects, thanks to all the open looks created by Chris Paul). His offensive numbers would have been even better if he forced his way to the line more often to take advantage of his excellent free throw shooting, but Foye went to the charity stripe a career low 1.3 times per game this season, effectively wasting a talent that could be a true weapon. As is the case with his Clipper teammate Nick Young, Foye doesn’t play much defense or exert any energy rebounding the ball, making him little more than a spot-up shooter who can also play a bit of back-up point guard every now and then.

Leandro Barbosa (UFA)

The basics: 11.1 ppg, 2.0 rpg, 1.5 apg, .425 FG%, .815 FT%, .382 3-PT%, 14.07 PER

Advanced stats: 5.4 rebound rate (58th among qualifying SGs), 7.9 defensive rebound rate (72nd), 2.8 offensive rebound rate (27th), 10.9 assist rate (68th), 10.7 turnover rate (50th)

Shooting percentages by location (with Toronto): At rim: 60.7%, 3-9 feet: 36.4%, 10-15 feet: 59.3%, 16-23 feet: 30%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Off-screens: .893 ppp (48th percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .764 ppp (53rd percentile), Transition: 1.112 ppp (45th percentile), 
Spot-ups: 1.054 ppp (79th percentile), Isolations: .892 ppp (84th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .95 ppp (46th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .803 ppp (43rd percentile), Isolations: .675 ppp (75th percentile), Off screens: .912 ppp (47th percentile)

Noticing a trend yet? As with many of the other names on this list, Barbosa is an instant offense guy off the bench who, you guessed it, neither rebounds nor defends. Get him the right matchup and use him in the proper spots and he’s certainly capable of putting points on the board in a hurry -- the problem is that he’s likely to do it for both teams due to his aversion to the defensive end of the floor.

C.J. Miles (UFA)

The basics: 9.1 ppg, 2.1 rpg, 1.2 apg, .381 FG%, .794 FT%, .307 3-PT%, 12.46 PER

Advanced stats: 5.8 rebound rate (49th among qualifying SGs), 9.0 defensive rebound rate (59th), 2.7 offensive rebound rate (32nd), 10.7 assist rate (69th), 8.2 turnover rate (14th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 61.9%, 3-9 feet: 29%, 10-15 feet: 29.2%, 16-23 feet: 28%

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Spot-ups: .953 ppp (58th percentile), Transition: 1.103 ppp (43rd percentile), Pick-and-roll ball handler: .696 ppp (38th percentile), Off-screens: .583 ppp (7th percentile)

Defense: Spot-ups: .913 ppp (56th percentile), Off screens: .821 ppp (63rd percentile),
Isolations: .717 ppp (67th percentile), defending pick-and-roll ball handler: 1.04 ppp (5th percentile)

Miles took a step back after an encouraging 2010-11 season. His shooting numbers plummeted across the board, as did his rebound and assist rates. The 25-year-old is not without his charms; he is long, athletic, skilled and an improving defender. Consistency, however, is the crux of the problem with Miles. He’s a streaky shooter and his shot selection leaves much to be desired on many a night. He also doesn’t rebound at nearly the rate that his size suggests he should. Miles is still young enough to improve in each of these areas but after seven years in the league it’s becoming harder to envision him making a significant leap.