2013 Free Agency Preview Part II: Shooting Guards

A statistical and subjective look at the top free agent shooting guards available this summer
by Jason Friedman
Rockets.com Writer/Reporter

HOUSTON - In free agency, the name of the game is value. Give $15 million a year to one of the ten best players on the planet and the deal will likely turn out to be an absolute bargain. But hand half that amount to an average player who just so happens to be coming off a career year and you may quickly find yourself stuck with the kind of cumbersome contract that kills flexibility and stifles a club’s ability to improve going forward.

Such is the dance that takes place between players, agents and general managers every summer in the NBA. Free agency offers teams a unique opportunity to improve their rosters in a hurry. But buyers beware because it can just as easily hamstring squads who roll the dice on the wrong player at the wrong price for the wrong number of years. Figuring out the proper price tag for those rare, precious and irreplaceable blue chip guys is easy; for everyone else tough, smart and calculated decisions must be made to ensure teams get enough bang for their free agent buck. 

That is the key concept to keep in mind as Rockets.com rolls out our annual, position-by-position breakdown of the players available on the free agent market. Today in Part 2 of our free agency primer we’re taking a statistical and subjective look at some of the top shooting guards who are hitting the open market this summer (shot location statistics courtesy of HoopData.com, shot charts courtesy of NBA.com and Synergy stats courtesy of Synergy Sports Technology). Click here if you missed Part 1 in which we examined the free agent market for point guards. We’ll break down the talent available at the other positions in the days and weeks to come. 

Andre Iguodala (Early Termination Option)

The basics: 13.0 ppg, 5.4 apg, 5.3 rpg, 1.7 spg, .451 FG%, .317 3-PT%, .574 FT%, 15.27 PER

Advanced stats: 8.5 rebound rate (11th among qualifying SGs), 13.5 defensive rebound rate (9th), 3.4 offensive rebound rate (12th), 26.5 assist rate (3rd), 12.6 turnover rate (61st)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 74.1% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 40.0%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 33.3% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 31% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .851 points per possession (39th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .847 ppp (60th percentile), Spot-ups: .813 ppp (29th percentile), Transition: 1.128 ppp (51st percentile), Off screens: .859 ppp (46th percentile), Cuts: 1.359 ppp (86th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .804 ppp (43rd percentile), Spot-ups: .835 ppp (83rd percentile), Isolation: .629 ppp (90th percentile), Off screens: .949 ppp (39th percentile)

Andre Iguodala 2012-13 shot chart:

Assuming he opts out of the final year of his contract, Andre Iguodala figures to be the most highly sought after player at his position this summer. The two-time gold medal winner with Team USA (2010 at the World Championships and 2012 at the Olympics) is an elite athlete, terrific passer and one of the four best wing defenders in the NBA (with LeBron James, Paul George and Tony Allen making up the other members of that fearsome foursome). Iguodala can shut down opponents at multiple positions thanks to his extraordinary combination of size, speed and smarts, and he’s a playmaker at the other end of the floor, too, thanks to his floor vision and outstanding ability to finish at the rim. Of some concern, however, is his floundering shooting stroke. The 29-year-old posted the lowest true shooting percentage of his career this past season, primarily due to his mysteriously free-falling free throw percentage (after knocking down a career-best 82 percent of his freebies in 2006-07, Iguodala’s free three percentage has steadily plummeted to the point where he posted a career-low 57.5 percent mark this past season). But let’s be clear: no team is signing the former Arizona Wildcat to be a perimeter threat; they’ll be bringing him in because few players possess his dual-threat ability to be an impact player at both ends of the floor.

Tyreke Evans (RFA)

The basics: 15.2 ppg, 3.5 apg, 4.4 rpg, 1.4 spg, .478 FG%, .338 3-PT%, .775 FT%, 18.16 PER

Advanced stats: 8.2 rebound rate (14th among qualifying SGs), 13.5 defensive rebound rate (9th), 3.1 offensive rebound rate (19th), 18.4 assist rate (20th), 10.3 turnover rate (41st)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 63.2% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 27.0%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 40.0% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 31% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .883 points per possession (51st percentile), Isolations (including passes): .837 ppp (57th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.008 ppp (65th percentile), Transition: 1.154 ppp (58th percentile), Off screens: 1.219 ppp (94th percentile), Cuts: 1.122 ppp (39th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .778 ppp (51st percentile), Spot-ups: .951 ppp (60th percentile), Isolation: .857 ppp (40th percentile), Off screens: .973 ppp (33rd percentile)

Tyreke Evans 2012-13 shot chart:

Who is Tyreke Evans? That’s a question executives around the league are undoubtedly asking themselves as they contemplate the kind of offer they’re willing to put in front of the talented 23-year-old this summer. Evans appeared to be on a surefire path to stardom after a rookie season that saw him average 20 points, 5 assists and 5 rebounds per game (although, to be sure, there was some occasionally egregious stat-padding taking place to ensure he reached those marks by season’s end). Since that time, however, Evans and the Kings have been in a perpetual struggle to identify his best position and find the ideal situations in which he can succeed. The Memphis University product has an impressive handle and terrific size and length, giving him the ability to penetrate, get to the rim and draw fouls in bunches. He’s a very good rebounder for his position and has the physical tools to be a plus defender as well (though admittedly that has not yet manifested itself in consistent on-court defensive results as of yet). If the NBA were a league of one-on-one games, he might find himself competing for the title on a yearly basis. But therein lies the rub – when the real games begin Evans’ inability to effectively space the floor and his proclivity toward over-dribbling aren’t conducive to winning basketball. But again: Evans is still just 23. And he did post a career-best 33.8 percent mark from downtown this season. The attributes of a very good player are still very much there. It will just be incumbent upon him and his team to make sure they fully translate those skills into five-on-five success.

Monta Ellis (UFA – Player option)

The basics: 19.2 ppg, 6.0 apg, 3.9 rpg, 2.1 spg, .416 FG%, .287 3-PT%, .773 FT%, 16.30 PER

Advanced stats: 5.5 rebound rate (46th among qualifying SGs), 9.8 defensive rebound rate (34th), 1.5 offensive rebound rate (48th), 21.1 assist rate (10th), 10.8 turnover rate (47th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 61.7% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 36.7%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 43.0% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 34% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .863 points per possession (44th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .805 ppp (51st percentile), Spot-ups: .954 ppp (56th percentile), Transition: 1.05 ppp (36th percentile), Off screens: .843 ppp (43rd percentile), Cuts: 1.016 ppp (21st percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .591 ppp (92nd percentile), Spot-ups: .858 ppp (80th percentile), Isolation: .817 ppp (50th percentile), Off screens: .856 ppp (57th percentile)

Monta Ellis 2012-13 shot chart:

Prediction: One day Monta Ellis is going to win Sixth Man of the Year. His ability to create shots, score and serve as a playmaker make him an ideal candidate to be a supremely effective instant offense guy coming off the bench for a contender. The only problem: it’s probably going to be a while before that happens because Ellis is still likely to be a starter in this league for years to come. That’s not an inherently bad thing, mind you – with the right team around him Ellis can definitely contribute in a positive manner. He’s a gifted scorer and over time he’s become a more willing passer, as demonstrated by the career-high assist rate he posted this season (during the last three months of the campaign Ellis nearly averaged seven assists per game). But his scoring skills too often come at the cost of efficiency – too many midrange jumpers and not enough threes (the 27-year-old is a 31.8 percent three-point shooter for his career and he hasn’t cracked the 30 percent plateau two years running) – and though his defense has improved his lack of size and riverboat gambler nature often make him a liability on that end of the floor.

O.J. Mayo (UFA)

The basics: 15.3 ppg, 4.4 apg, 3.5 rpg, 1.1 spg, .449 FG%, .407 3-PT%, .820 FT%, 14.00 PER

Advanced stats: 5.6 rebound rate (44th among qualifying SGs), 9.6 defensive rebound rate (35th), 1.4 offensive rebound rate (54th), 21.2 assist rate (9th), 12.4 turnover rate (58th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 61.8% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 52.9%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 46.2% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 41% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .927 points per possession (68th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .976 ppp (86th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.088 ppp (79th percentile), Transition: 1.231 ppp (75th percentile), Off screens: .80 ppp (35th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .713 ppp (72nd percentile), Spot-ups: 1.075 ppp (27th percentile), Isolation: .867 ppp (38th percentile), Off screens: .951 ppp (38th percentile)

O.J. Mayo 2012-13 shot chart:

Mayo’s stock seemed set to soar when he began the season with a bang, averaging better than 20 points per game throughout the month of November. With Dirk Nowitzki sidelined due to injury, Mayo stepped up as a No. 1 option and temporarily helped keep the Mavs afloat with his strong play. The primary problem: Mayo was knocking down more than 50 percent of his three-point attempts during that time and, sooner or later, the regression-to-the-mean gods were destined to catch up to him. They did, and sure enough by season’s end the 25-year-old’s per-36 minute stats ultimately settled back into numbers that looked an awful lot like his career norms. That’s not necessarily a bad thing – Mayo has proven himself to be a nice complementary player who can stretch the floor and play some point in a pinch (his assist rate this past season blew his previous career-best out of the water) – but the fact of the matter is Mayo simply doesn’t draw enough fouls or put enough pressure on defenses by getting to the rim in bulk to be a true go-to guy on a playoff caliber club.

Manu Ginobili (UFA)

The basics: 11.8 ppg, 4.6 apg, 3.4 rpg, 1.3 spg, .425 FG%, .353 3-PT%, .796 FT%, 19.05 PER

Advanced stats: 8.3 rebound rate (12th among qualifying SGs), 13.4 defensive rebound rate (10th), 2.6 offensive rebound rate (26th), 26.5 assist rate (3rd), 12.7 turnover rate (63rd)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 66.9% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 31.3%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 31.6% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 30% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): 1.0 points per possession (89th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .73 ppp (34th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.157 ppp (89th percentile), Transition: 1.00 ppp (25th percentile), Off screens: 1.075 ppp (84th percentile), Cuts: 1.381 ppp (89th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .69 ppp (79th percentile), Spot-ups: .83 ppp (84th percentile), Isolation: .985 ppp (31st percentile), Off screens: .829 ppp (61st percentile)

Manu Ginobili 2012-13 shot chart:

Yes, he’s getting up there in age and, no, he’s almost certainly not leaving San Antonio, but Manu Ginobili still figures to be one of the more intriguing names to hit the free agent market this summer. Just take a look at those metrics. Despite dealing with the effects of injuries and age (a combo which is obviously interrelated), the soon-to-be 36-year-old still ranked as one of the top rebounders, passers and playmakers at his position. He can only realistically log about 20 minutes per game during the regular season at this point in his career and there exists a strong likelihood that he might have to sit out about 20 contests or so due to various bumps and bruises, but make no mistake: any contending team would love to steal Ginobili away from the Spurs and add his skill, championship-winning experience and guile to their roster.

Kevin Martin (UFA)

The basics: 14.0 ppg, 1.4 apg, 2.3 rpg, .9 spg, .450 FG%, .426 3-PT%, .890 FT%, 16.09 PER

Advanced stats: 4.8 rebound rate (54th among qualifying SGs), 7.4 defensive rebound rate (58th), 1.8 offensive rebound rate (42nd), 9.7 assist rate (60th), 9.2 turnover rate (22nd)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 73.8% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 27.3%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 49.0% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 43% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .888 points per possession (54th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .923 ppp (77th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.095 ppp (81st percentile), Transition: 1.439 ppp (95th percentile), Off screens: .932 ppp (63rd percentile), Cuts: 1.182 ppp (21st percentile), Hand offs: 1.303 ppp (96th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .736 ppp (65th percentile), Spot-ups: .881 ppp (75th percentile), Isolation: .742 ppp (70th percentile), Off screens: .86 ppp (55th percentile)

Kevin Martin 2012-13 shot chart:

Martin thrived in a sixth man role this past season and going forward that is likely to be the position that suits him best. He’s a smart, outstanding spot-up shooter and can be simply devastating in transition, leaking out early and locating the holes in scrambling defenses to set himself up for wide-open threes. But he doesn’t get to the rim nearly as often as he once did and his previously otherworldly free throw rate has plummeted, too. Given that he’s now 30-years-old, those characteristics probably aren’t going to experience a sudden spike that sees him return to career-best levels. But teams already possessing playmakers that find themselves in need of a superb floor spacer would be wise to look in K-Mart’s direction this summer assuming the price is right.

J.R. Smith (UFA)

The basics: 18.1 ppg, 2.7 apg, 5.3 rpg, 1.3 spg, .422 FG%, .356 3-PT%, .762 FT%, 17.67 PER

Advanced stats: 9.3 rebound rate (7th among qualifying SGs), 16.3 defensive rebound rate (3rd), 2.7 offensive rebound rate (23rd), 12.5 assist rate (50th), 7.7 turnover rate (7th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 66.2% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 36.1%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 41.6% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 41% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .949 points per possession (75th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .888 ppp (69th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.061 ppp (77th percentile), Transition: 1.133 ppp (53rd percentile), Off screens: 1.011 ppp (73rd percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .906 ppp (21st percentile), Spot-ups: .943 ppp (62nd percentile), Isolation: .951 ppp (19th percentile), Off screens: .854 ppp (57th percentile)

J.R. Smith 2012-13 shot chart:

Efficient shot selection in action: A light seemingly went on for J.R. Smith in the month of March, compelling him to use his considerable athletic gifts to attack the rim with abandon instead of settling for far too many tough, long-range jumpers. Suddenly Smith was going to the line six times per game (he’d averaged 2.5 free throw attempts the month before that), his scoring and efficiency skyrocketed, and the 27-year-old finished the season with a flourish that elevated the Knicks in the Eastern Conference and gave him the finishing kick he needed to seize the league’s Sixth Man of the year award. That paradigm shift in decision-making will be key to Smith’s impact going forward because his talent has never been questioned. He has unlimited range, is an excellent rebounder and can create off the dribble. But as Spiderman taught us: with great power comes great responsibility. Should Smith decide to more consistently utilize his offensive gifts for good rather than evil – and to put forth far more effort, energy and concentration on the defensive end – then he certainly has the capacity to play hero for a contending team going forward.

J.J. Redick (UFA)

The basics: 14.1 ppg, 3.8 apg, 2.2 rpg, .5 spg, .434 FG%, .366 3-PT%, .900 FT%, 14.74 PER

Advanced stats: 4.0 rebound rate (63rd among qualifying SGs), 7.3 defensive rebound rate (61st), .8 offensive rebound rate (63rd), 21.2 assist rate (9th), 9.9 turnover rate (34th)

Shooting percentages by location (while with Orlando): At rim: 71.1% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 57.1%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 42.3% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 45% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats (while with Orlando): Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .986 points per possession (86th percentile), Isolations (including passes): 1.103 ppp (96th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.273 ppp (96th percentile), Transition: 1.239 ppp (78th percentile), Off screens: .919 ppp (60th percentile), Cuts: 1.3 ppp (76th percentile), Hand offs: .918 ppp (62nd percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .667 ppp (85th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.115 ppp (19th percentile), Isolation: .698 ppp (78th percentile), Off screens: .983 ppp (32nd percentile)

J.J. Redick 2012-13 shot chart:

A testament to the power of hard work and diligence, Redick has made the not-so-simple transformation from college gunner to solid two-guard who can stretch the floor with his shooting while offering an impressive ability to pass and take care of the ball as well. The 28-year-old has also become a fundamentally sound defender, though he’s not at all disruptive on that end as seen by the dearth of steals and blocked shots he records. But there’s real value to be found here, especially since no team can ever have too much shooting, nor too many guys who can be plugged in at the end of games to cement potential victories at the free throw line.

Tony Allen (UFA)

The basics: 8.9 ppg, 1.2 apg, 4.6 rpg, 1.5 spg, .445 FG%, .125 3-PT%, .717 FT%, 13.26 PER

Advanced stats: 10.2 rebound rate (4th among qualifying SGs), 13.8 defensive rebound rate (8th), 6.6 offensive rebound rate (2nd), 10.7 assist rate (58th), 10.3 turnover rate (41st)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 58.8% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 28.0%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 36.7% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 33% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .877 points per possession (49th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .814 ppp (52nd percentile), Spot-ups: .662 ppp (11th percentile), Transition: 1.089 ppp (44th percentile), Cuts: 1.063 ppp (26th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .649 ppp (87th percentile), Spot-ups: .872 ppp (78th percentile), Isolation: .739 ppp (70th percentile), Off screens: .838 ppp (59th percentile)

Tony Allen 2012-13 shot chart:

No need to spend a significant amount of time poring over Allen’s shot chart and shooting percentages. You know what you’re getting with this guy: one of the best, most disruptive wing defenders in the NBA. With his manic energy and unrelenting tenacity, Allen has carved out an impressive career that’s seen him make life miserable for the offensive stalwarts he faces while also earning a rightful amount of the credit for infusing Memphis with its trademark grit and grind style. How much is that worth on the open market and, at 31 years of age, for how much longer can he keep it up? Those are the questions prospective employers will be asking themselves while contemplating the addition of one of the more unique players in the game today.

Ray Allen (UFA – Player option)

The basics: 10.9 ppg, 1.7 apg, 2.7 rpg, .8 spg, .449 FG%, .419 3-PT%, .886 FT%, 14.72 PER

Advanced stats: 6.6 rebound rate (27th among qualifying SGs), 10.1 defensive rebound rate (32nd), 2.6 offensive rebound rate (26th), 14.1 assist rate (42nd), 10.7 turnover rate (44th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 58.9% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 58.6%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 45.5% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 33% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .981 points per possession (85th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .899 ppp (71st percentile), Spot-ups: 1.278 ppp (97th percentile), Transition: .913 ppp (15th percentile), Off screens: .91 ppp (59th percentile), Cuts: 1.326 ppp (81st percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .692 ppp (79th percentile), Spot-ups: .978 ppp (53rd percentile), Isolation: .903 ppp (29th percentile), Off screens: 1.14 ppp (12th percentile)

Ray Allen 2012-13 shot chart:

Why is Allen so low on this list? Simply put, it’s tough to envision him opting out of the final year of his contract and leaving Miami given that the Heat present the future Hall of Famer with a near perfect environment for his talents at this point in his career. The 37-year-old frequently needs to be hidden on the defensive end but he can still knock down open jumpers with the best of them; something he’ll likely be able to do another 37 years from now – his stroke is that pure. So should the unforeseen take place and Allen does actually decide to leave the creature comforts of South Beach, there will no doubt be plenty of demand for his sharpshooting services.

Gerald Henderson (RFA)

The basics: 15.5 ppg, 2.6 apg, 3.7 rpg, 1.0 spg, .447 FG%, .330 3-PT%, .824 FT%, 16.48 PER

Advanced stats: 6.7 rebound rate (24th among qualifying SGs), 10.8 defensive rebound rate (26th), 2.9 offensive rebound rate (19th), 13.9 assist rate (43rd), 8.5 turnover rate (14th)

Shooting percentages by location: At rim: 61.5% (SGs averaged 63.7% from that distance in ’12-‘13), 3-9 feet: 41.4%, (SG average: 40.5%), 10-15 feet: 40.2% (SG average: 42.9%), 16-23 feet: 44% (SG average: 38.1%)

Noteworthy Synergy stats: Offense: Pick-and-roll ball handler (including passes): .891 points per possession (55th percentile), Isolations (including passes): .770 ppp (43rd percentile), Spot-ups: 1.072 ppp (78th percentile), Transition: 1.266 ppp (82nd percentile), Off screens: .716 ppp (24th percentile), Cuts: 1.269 ppp (70th percentile)

Defense: Defending pick-and-roll ball handler: .936 ppp (17th percentile), Spot-ups: 1.145 ppp (13th percentile), Isolation: .662 ppp (84th percentile), Off screens: .972 ppp (34th percentile)

Gerald Henderson 2012-13 shot chart:

Don’t sleep on Gerald Henderson. The 25-year-old has toiled in anonymity on some brutal Bobcats teams, but he’s steadily improved every year he’s been in the league culminating in this past season that saw him put up the best numbers of his career while doing so more efficiently than ever before. Henderson cut down on the number of long twos that had been his calling card in previous seasons, while getting to the free throw line at a higher than ever rate. The Duke University product raised his three-point percentage to a career-best 33 percent and though he obviously still needs to get that number higher, the strides he’s made in that area – and his higher-than-average percentage on long twos – suggest he’s capable of doing exactly that. Henderson is a good rebounder for his position and though he’s slightly undersized he’s displayed an ability to be a plus one-on-one defender.

Other notables: Alan Anderson (UFA), Leandro Barbosa (UFA), Rodrigue Beaubois (RFA), Marco Belinelli (UFA), Keith Bogans (UFA), Daequan Cook (UFA), Wayne Ellington (RFA), Randy Foye (UFA), Francisco Garcia (UFA-Team option), Daniel Gibson (UFA), Xavier Henry (UFA), Jodie Meeks (UFA – Team option), Anthony Morrow (UFA), Gary Neal (RFA), Brandon Rush (UFA – Player option), Jerry Stackhouse (UFA), Martell Webster (UFA), Elliot Williams (UFA), Nick Young (UFA)