Brandon Knight is no longer the youngest Piston. At 19, Andre Drummond might hold that title for a few more seasons. Still, Knight is just 20, not an age when players generally ascend to leadership status.

Yet Arnie Kander, in his unique position as Pistons strength and conditioning coach and universally acknowledged guru of all things to do with the body and spirit, sees in Knight the qualities that have made him an unmistakable team leader even as he’s about to embark on his first full NBA season.

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. – The Detroit Pistons will host an open practice inside the Oakland University Athletic Center Arena (The O’Rena) on Saturday, October 6 from 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Admission is free for all fans and Oakland University students and doors will open at 11:45 a.m. Fans are encouraged to park in the Oakland University Athletic Center Arena parking structure or at parking lots 16 and 18.

(Editor’s note: True Blue Pistons today concludes a five-part series examining the 15-man Pistons roster by position with a look at small forwards Tayshaun Prince, Corey Maggette and Kyle Singler.)

So durable and reliable has Tayshaun Prince proven over his first 10 NBA seasons, he’s given Joe Dumars the luxury of being able to invest the finite resources a salary-cap era demands in places other than backup small forward.

When Swedish national team officials began to press Jonas Jerebko last spring, as the compacted 2011-12 NBA season wound down, his instincts were to sit out Eurobasket qualifying competition this summer. Pistons strength coach Arnie Kander supported him. As pleased as both were with Jerebko’s recovery from the October 2010 Achilles injury that cost him his second season, they didn’t want to overburden the tendon and further stall his career.

But as April turned to May and May to June, a re-energized Jerebko felt the itch.

(Editor’s note: True Blue Pistons today continues a five-part series examining the 15-man Pistons roster by position with a look at power forwards Jason Maxiell and Jonas Jerebko.)

Jason Maxiell’s elevation to the starting lineup sparked a dramatic turnaround to the 2011-12 Pistons season. Lawrence Frank is on record with his disdain for the concept of “incumbent starters,” but it’s going to be difficult for anyone to unseat Maxiell despite the apparent depth the Pistons enjoy at power forward.

(Editor’s note: True Blue Pistons today continues a five-part series examining the 15-man Pistons roster by position with a look centers Greg Monroe, Andre Drummond and Slava Kravtsov. Coming Monday: power forwards.)

If Greg Monroe, the guy who couldn’t get off of John Kuester’s bench in his first two games and now sits on the cusp of All-Star status, can make the same strides in the next two years as he did in his first two NBA seasons … well, at some point soon we’ll be talking about his place in Pistons lore.

(Editor’s note: True Blue Pistons today continues a five-part series examining the 15-man Pistons roster by position with a look at shooting guards Rodney Stuckey, Khris Middleton and Kim English. Coming Friday: centers.)

Rodney Stuckey missed the first 27 games of his rookie year on a team that judged success by the harshest standard – championship or bust. Yet by the time that 2007-08 season ended, Stuckey was a rotation fixture and a central piece of the franchise’s future.

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