(Editor’s note: Pistons.com continues a six-part series profiling the players who participated in Orlando Pro Summer League and project to be a part of the 2012-13 regular-season roster with a look at Kim English. Coming Friday: Kyle Singler.)

George David interviews somewhere between 60 to 80 college players every year in preparation for the June draft, either at the Portsmouth (Va.) Invitational or the NBA draft combine in Chicago or in Auburn Hills when the Pistons bring players in for individual workouts.

Within a few weeks of the Miami Heat winning the NBA title with a lineup that often featured five essentially perimeter players, the Pistons added two 7-footers. Did the Pistons just get big as the NBA was going small?

No. Wrong way to look at it. What the Pistons did in adding Andre Drummond and Slava Kravtsov was arm themselves with the ability to be as flexible as they need to be in an NBA where not many teams have the luxury of winning the same way every night.

(Editor’s note: Pistons.com continues a six-part series profiling the players who participated in Orlando Pro Summer League and project to be a part of the 2012-13 regular-season roster with a look at Khris Middleton. Coming Wednesday: Kim English.)

When Kim English’s playing days are over, there’s a future in coaching or personnel evaluation awaiting him if he desires. English is a video addict and a basketball devotee.

We’re still learning about the implications of the NBA’s new collective bargaining agreement, struck last December. And when I say “we,” I mean it in both the broadest possible sense – the public at large – and in increasingly narrower bands, including educated and interested outsiders with an eye for interpreting the CBA’s legalese and even NBA teams whose business models are governed by it.

But it’s fair to say we know this much about the agreement that ended the five-month lockout last Thanksgiving weekend and enabled an abbreviated but legitimate NBA season: Smart wins.

(Editor’s note: Pistons.com continues a six-part series profiling the players who participated in Orlando Pro Summer League and project to be a part of the 2012-13 regular-season roster with a look at Austin Daye. Coming Monday: Khris Middleton.)

Have you had a first day on a new job? You’re generally allowed to ease into it, right? Arrange your personal pictures on the desk, find out where the supplies are kept, maybe get taken out to lunch by the boss.

George David’s first day as Pistons assistant general manager started in Auburn Hills laying the groundwork for a trade that could significantly alter the franchise’s direction and ended past midnight in New York after a hastily arranged workout with Andre Drummond.

(Editor’s note: Pistons.com continues a six-part series profiling the players who participated in Orlando Pro Summer League and project to be a part of the 2012-13 regular-season roster with a look at Andre Drummond. Coming Friday: Austin Daye.)

ORLANDO – The Pistons felt they had a strong sense of Andre Drummond’s fiber when they made him the No. 9 pick in the 2012 draft three weeks ago. They believed they were getting a kid with a good head and a good heart, and that those two things ultimately would allow the tantalizing raw ability within him to be realized.

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