Stories behind each New Orleans Pelicans logo
By: Jim Eichenhofer, Hornets.com, @Jim_Eichenhofer

In the words of designer Rodney Richardson, here are more extensive details on the stories and explanations behind the new logos of the New Orleans Pelicans:

PRIMARY LOGO
“Our desire was to bring out the characteristics of the pelican that have caused it to stand as a symbol for this city and region. The focus, beauty and strength it displays when it dives from the air into the water for its food – we wanted to capture that strength and focus. And as it represents new life, survival and resourcefulness, NEW ORLEANS rests on its wings. References to the style, flourish and heritage of the city are subtly ingrained in the mark.”

FLEUR DE LIS LOGO
“This dynastic, artistic, emblematic and heraldic symbol is as long-standing in its representation of the region as the pelican. Our iteration of the fleur de lis from the city’s flag – and its incorporation of the pelican – create even deeper ties to these meaningful representatives.”

CRESCENT CITY LOGO
“We wanted to create a mark that represents the city itself. Affectionately known as the Crescent City due to its position in the crescent bend of the Mississippi River, the city is actually situated at the tip of the crescent. This is a position of good fortune. And as the word ‘crescent’ actually means ‘to grow’, we wanted to capture that spirit as the city continues to grow and flourish. This is a mark that truly pays homage to the growing life of the city.”

THE PELICANS NAME
“The pelican, as a symbol, represents teamwork, group dynamics, regeneration/renewal and resourcefulness. It symbolizes the determination to not only survive, but thrive – even when the odds are stacked against him. It’s for these reasons, among others, that early explorers and settlers adopted the pelican as a symbol for the region and eventually the state. The brown pelican (the pelican of Louisiana and the Gulf South) is the only North American pelican that aggressively dives from the air into the water for its food, making him the only pelican species that is an active hunter, not an inactive forager.”