NBA Time Capsules: 1970s


More Time Capsules: 1940-60s | 1980-90s

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Julius Erving, Hall of Fame Player

Julius Erving, the great and wondrous "Dr. J," was a wizard with the ball, performing feats never before seen: midair spins and whirls punctuated by powerful slam dunks. He is often considered to have been the main catalyst for the ABA-NBA merger in 1976. In his five ABA seasons, Erving won three scoring titles, three Most Valuable Player Awards and two league championships. During his 11-year NBA career Erving was an All-Star each season, the league's Most Valuable Player in 1981 and a five-time member of the All-NBA First Team.

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Rick Barry, Hall of Fame Player

There have been few players in basketball history that played with more passion and competitive zeal than Rick Barry. He was an aggressive force who would use any means necessary to score and win. During his 14-year professional career in the ABA and NBA, Barry was a 12-time All-Star. In 1975, Barry was named the NBA Finals MVP after leading the underdog Warriors to a four-game sweep of the Bullets. Barry tallied 25,279 points and was named to nine All-NBA/ABA First Teams over his career.

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Bill Walton, Hall of Fame Player

During his prime as a member of the Portland Trail Blazers in the mid-1970s -- a prime that lasted a mere three years -- Bill Walton drew comparisons to such players as Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Russell. After achieving superstardom playing for John Wooden's powerhouse UCLA Bruins in the early '70s and winning three straight College Player of the Year Awards, Walton was destined to become an NBA legend. When he was healthy, Walton had few peers. He won the NBA MVP award while playing for the defending NBA champion Trail Blazers in 1977-78.

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Tiny Archibald, Hall of Fame Player

The player who proved the "little man" could excel in professional basketball logged 14 NBA seasons. Archibald's penetrations were so difficult to stop he led the NBA in free throws made three times and free throw attempts twice. In 1972, he became the only player in NBA history to lead the league in scoring and assists in the same season. Archibald was an All-NBA First Team selection three times and a six-time All-Star. He was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1996.

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Daryl Dawkins, Broke two backboards in a weeks time

Darryl Dawkins was drafted with the fifth overall pick of the 1975 NBA draft by the Philadelphia 76ers straight out of high school. "Chocolate Thunder", known for his backboard-shattering dunks, played 14 seasons in the NBA. After breaking his second backboard in a weeks' time in 1979, Dawkins said, "I didn't mean to destroy it. It was the power, the Chocolate Thunder. I could feel it surging through my body, fighting to get out. I had no control over it."

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Henry Bibby, Former Player

Bibby was the starting point guard on three NCAA title teams (1970-72) at UCLA, earning consensus All-American honors while serving as the team's captain as a senior in 1972. The Bruins went 87-3 during his varsity collegiate career (one of the losses was to USC in 1970), including 30-0 in 1972. He then played nine years in the National Basketball Association, averaging 8.6 points, 2.3 rebounds and 3.4 assists during his career. He won a title with the New York Knicks in 1973 as a rookie.

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Marvin Barnes, Former ABA and NBA Player

Barnes earned ABA Rookie of the Year honors in 1974-75. That season, he set the ABA All-Time Record for most two-point field goals in one game with 27 vs. Memphis Sounds on March 16 1975. He was a member of 1974-75 ABA All-Pro Team and an All-Star in both of his ABA seasons. Barnes then went on to play four seasons in the NBA from 1977-80, averaging 9.2 points and 4.4 rebounds in 171 games.

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Norm Drucker, Former NBA Supervisor of Officials

Drucker was considered one of the top refs in the NBA in the 1950s and 1960s. He once said, "Put a fellow of minimal experience in a pro basketball game and you'd have a riot out there in two minutes." Drucker was an NBA referee for 15 years before serving as the ABA's Supervisor of Officials in the ABA from 1969-1973. When the ABA and NBA merged in 1976, he returned to officiate NBA games, and in 1977, was appointed Supervisor of Officials in the NBA.