SEASON RECAPS

1992-93

Coach Larry Brown loved to tinker with his roster and he and Elgin Baylor made some adjustments before the 1992-93 season. In a three-team deal, the Clippers acquired former Rookie of the Year Mark Jackson from New York and big center Stanley Roberts from Orlando. The price was a sore-kneed Charles Smith and veteran point guard Doc Rivers. Brown also brought in big John Williams from Washington.



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  • 1991-92

    Elgin Baylor brought in some veteran help to augment the Clippers' obviously talented, but very young nucleus. 36-year-old center James Edwards and 30-year-old guard Doc Rivers joined the young players with a mandate to show them how to win. Both vets had a world of playoff experience while the core of the Clipper youngsters - Grant, Manning, Norman and Smith - had yet to play a single game in the post-season. Surely, their time was now.



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  • 1990-91

    On May 25, 1990, former NBA Coach of the Year Mike Schuler was named to replace Don Casey as coach of the Clippers. He’d Won 127 games and lost 74 in two and a half years of coaching the Portland Trail Blazers. His teams were noted as fast-breaking and high scoring. It looked like a good fit for this promising young Clipper team.



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  • 1989-90

    You could see it coming as the 1989-90 season opened. The pieces were in place for this to be a very good team in the years to come. Manning was due back from last season’s knee injury in the first month of the season, Charles Smith was a rising young star, Ken Norman was better than anyone had dared hope, Gary Grant was called "the General" for a reason and big Benoit Benjamin was a legit space-eater in the middle.



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  • 1988-89

    It looked like the team’s run of bad luck might be turning when the Clippers won the NBA’s first draft Lottery in the Spring of 1988. The prize was clearly consensus college player of the year Danny Manning who had just led Kansas to the NCAA Championship. Coach Shue had years earlier coached Danny’s father, Ed Manning. Now, he’d coach the 22 year old son who possessed point guard skills and vision in a 6-10 body.



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  • 1987-88

    Change was the by-word in the off-season going into the 1986-87 campaign. Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor replaced Carl Scheer as General Manager in April of 1986. His first act was to retain Don Chaney as head coach. His busy summer saw him send injured star Derek Smith to Sacramento in exchange for Larry Drew, Mike Woodson and a future first round draft pick. The addition of Drew was critical because star point guard Norm Nixon tore up his left knee while playing in a softball game at Central Park in New York in July. Subsequent surgery would end his season before it began.



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  • 1986-87

    Change was the by-word in the off-season going into the 1986-87 campaign. Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor replaced Carl Scheer as General Manager in April of 1986. His first act was to retain Don Chaney as head coach. His busy summer saw him send injured star Derek Smith to Sacramento in exchange for Larry Drew, Mike Woodson and a future first round draft pick. The addition of Drew was critical because star point guard Norm Nixon tore up his left knee while playing in a softball game at Central Park in New York in July. Subsequent surgery would end his season before it began.



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  • 1985-86

    The 1985-86 season opened with great promise. General Manager Carl Scheer had traded away the oft-injured Bill Walton to Boston in exchange for the reliable and colorful Cedric Maxwell and a 1986 first round draft pick. The drafting of massive center Benoit Benjamin made the move of Walton possible.



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  • 1984-85

    In 1984, owner Donald Sterling moved the Clippers to Los Angeles. But a new home was not the only change for the team. The Clippers sent Cummings, Pierce, and Craig Hodges to the Milwaukee Bucks for Marques Johnson, Junior Bridgeman, Harvey Catchings, and cash. Also new to the team was first-round draft choice Michael Cage.



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  • 1983-84

    Paul Silas's reign as head coach came to an end after the 1982-83 season, when he was replaced by Jim Lynam. Silas left the Clippers with a three-year record of 78-168 and a .317 winning percentage. The franchise made some major changes on the court as well. With Bill Walton a big question mark in the middle, the Clippers sent Chambers to the Seattle SuperSonics in exchange for 7-2 center James Donaldson. The team also picked up Norm Nixon in a deal that sent Swen Nater and rookie draftee Byron Scott to the Los Angeles Lakers.



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  • 1982-83

    When the 1982-83 season opened the Clippers had reason for optimism. Bill Walton, whose injured feet had limited him to only 14 games during the previous four years, was back. Tom Chambers was coming off a fine rookie campaign. And the team had added veteran guard Lionel Hollins and had picked up promising rookie Terry Cummings in the 1982 NBA Draft.



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  • 1981-82

    On June 16, 1981, the team changed hands once again when Beverly Hills attorney and real estate mogul Donald T. Sterling bought the club from Ira Levin. Despite the change, the 1981-82 season was an especially difficult one. Center Bill Walton missed another year, Freeman Williams and Phil Smith were traded away, and Swen Nater missed 61 games because of a knee injury. The Clippers opened the campaign with a 125-110 win over the Rockets, then lost 10 of their next 11 games. December brought a nine-game losing streak. The team's best month was January, when it managed a 6-9 record. Halfway through the season, San Diego's record was only 13-29.



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  • 1980-81

    Paul Silas replaced Shue as head coach before the 1980-81 campaign, and the Clippers traded Lloyd B. Free to the Golden State Warriors for six-year veteran Phil Smith and a first-round draft choice. But the year was over for San Diego before it began-during training camp Walton's feet gave out once again, and he missed the entire season.



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  • 1979-80

    San Diego took a huge risk in the 1979 summer by signing free agent Bill Walton from Portland. The 6-11 redhead with the fragile feet had missed the entire previous season because of injury. The acquisition backfired, and the Clippers were forced to give Kermit Washington, Kevin Kunnert, and a first-round draft choice as compensation. Walton reinjured his foot and played only 14 games for San Diego.



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  • 1978-79


    San Diego had not been home to an NBA basketball club since 1971, when the San Diego Rockets had moved to Houston after a four-year stay in southern California. Levin renamed his club the Clippers and appointed Gene Shue as the new head coach for 1978-79. The Clippers got a good performance out of Lloyd B. Free (later known as World B. Free), who had come to San Diego after three years in Philadelphia. Free averaged 28.8 points and finished second in the league in scoring, only 0.8 points per game behind league leader George Gervin of the San Antonio Spurs. Also turning in a solid season for the Clippers was Randy Smith, who finished his fourth consecutive season with a scoring average of better than 20 points per game (20.5).



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