Celtics Honor African American Leaders at Event

The Celtics banded together with the Massachusetts Army National Guard for their annual Black History Month event honoring the monumental actions of African American leaders of our nation.

WALTHAM, Mass. – Sports have served as a tool to unite people from different walks of life for decades. During the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s the Boston Celtics transcended boundaries drafting the first African American player to the NBA and just years later naming the first African American coach in North American professional sports, Bill Russell.

On Monday afternoon the Celtics banded together with the Massachusetts Army National Guard for their annual Black History Month event honoring the monumental actions of African American leaders of our nation.

Twenty-seven JROTC students from Community Academy of Science and Health (C.A.S.H) in Dorchester, Mass. joined Eastern Conference Player of the Week Jared Sullinger and Celtics legend and Assistant Coach Walter McCarty out at the team’s practice facility in Waltham, Mass.

Setting the stage for the afternoon the group participated in a quick icebreaker challenging their current knowledge of noteworthy historic events.

“Montgomery, Alabama,” Sullinger stated when posed a question regarding Rosa Parks.

One young man was puzzled by the question, “What happened at Central High School in Little Rock, Ark.?”

McCarty enlightened him with his answer regarding the desegregation of schools following the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Board of Education.

Next, the teens broke off into four groups to cram for the Celtics original game of Slammin’ Trivia. Each group received a study guide with information highlighting pivotal moments in political, entertainment, military and sports history. A team captain was assigned to each group to help provide assistance.

Senior Manager of Community Relations Dave Hoffman explained, “They say in education you want to study to learn not study to memorize.”

So after 12 intense minutes of studying the teens let off some steam down on the practice court challenging the Celtics hosts to a 3-point shooting contest and a game of knockout.

“Hopefully this approach helped the youth solidify some of the information they were able to gather on the study sheet,” said Hoffman.

As competition heated up the group settled onto the bleachers to go head-to-head to test their newly-developed knowledge.

Team Sullinger got off to a quick start in the jeopardy style game and proved to hold the most understanding of African American history as they were undeniably the champions with an unprecedented score.

To congratulate all participants on their hard work the teens were awarded tickets to attend a Celtics game on Feb. 26 during the culmination of the Celtics’ month-long initiative to celebrate Black History.

To find educational information and facts to celebrate Black History during the month of February, click here.

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