Highlights

Milwaukee completed the lockout-shortened season with a winning record at home for the third consecutive year and 13th time in the last 14 seasons. Despite finishing four games out of the eighth seed in the East, the Bucks remained in the postseason hunt until three days before the season ended, when a victory for the Philadelphia 76ers clinched their playoff spot.
The Bucks tallied 100+ points in 33 games, the first time they had scored over 100 in 30+ games since the 2008-09 season when they did so 36 times. Milwaukee posted a 25-8 record over the 33 games in which they cracked the century mark.
Milwaukee ranked third in the NBA with 23.48 assists per game and led the league in games with 30 or more assists with 13, five more than the next highest team (Chicago). The Bucks went 12-1 in those games. Additionally, Milwaukee held the spot for the highest single- game total of assists in the NBA during 2011-12 with 38 in a 115-105 win at Cleveland on March 14.
Forward Ersan Ilyasova had a breakout season, posting career highs in scoring (13.0 ppg), rebounding (8.8 rpg), FG% (.492), 3P% (.455), 20-point games (11) and double-doubles (20) while playing just 27.6 minutes per game. He became the first player to average 12 points and eight rebounds in under 28 minutes since Arvydas Sabonis (14.5 ppg, 8.1 rpg and 23.8 minutes) did so during the 1995-96 season.
Both Larry Sanders and Ekpe Udoh ranked at the top of the league for reserve players with multi-block games. Udoh was first with 26, and Sanders finished the season close behind at third with 23. The duo ranked No. 1 and 2 in the NBA for reserve players with threeblock games - Udoh had 14 and Sanders had 12. Udoh also finished the season ranked 11th in the league for blocks per game with 1.67.
The Bucks bench ranked near the top of the NBA when looking at stats recorded by hoopstats.com. Milwaukee’s reserves averaged 33.8 ppg (9th in NBA), 17.5 rpg (5th), 8.4 apg (T-3rd) and 2.6 bpg (T-3rd). Additionally, the Bucks bench scored an average of 5.2 more points per game than their opponent’s bench, good for 5th in the NBA.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks finished just two games out of the final playoffs spot in the Eastern Conference. Milwaukee posted a winning record at home for the third consecutive season and for the 12th time in the last 14 seasons.
The Bucks set franchise records by holding 62 opponents under 100 points (second in the NBA) and 30 under 90 points (fourth in the NBA). From March 16 through April 6 they held a season-best 12 consecutive teams under 100 points (including five under 90). That string was tied for the fourth-longest in team history and is the longest since they went 13 games from January 27 through February 22 in 2006 (franchise record is 16 games in early 1999).
Andrew Bogut led the league in blocks with a career-high 2.6 per game. Thanks to 168 blocks this season (seventh for a single season in franchise history), Bogut moved from sixth to third place in franchise history with 618 career blocks. Over the course of the year, he passed Randy Breuer (474 blocks, 5th), Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (495, 4th) and Ervin Johnson (586, 3rd). With those 618 career blocks, the Aussie big man joined Alton Lister (804) and Harvey Catchings (710) as the only three players in Bucks history with 600 or more blocks.
Bucks opponents scored just 92.7 points per game, which was the second-fewest in team history (90.0 in the shortened 98-99 season) and the fewest for a full 82-game season.
The Bucks blocked 399 shots, their most since the 1993-94 season (407 blocks). Andrew Bogut (168) and Larry Sanders (72) accounted for 240 (60.2 percent) swats. Larry Sanders’ 72 blocks were fifth in team history for a rookie (just behind Anthony Avent’s 73 in 1992- 93) and his eight blocks on December 1 were tied for the second-most in the NBA this season. The last Bucks player to block eight shots was Ervin Johnson on April 7, 1998. Sanders’ 4.0 blocks per 48 minutes ranked him fourth in the NBA among players who appeared in at least 60 games.
The Bucks were hit harder than any other NBA club by injuries, as they lost a total of 275 games to injury/illness this season. Fourteen different players missed time due to injury and no player appeared in all of the team’s 82 games. This was the first time since 2007-08 that the Bucks didn’t have at least one player reach 82 games. Michael Redd led the club with 71 games missed due to an ACL/MCL tear in his left knee suffered in January of 2010. Drew Gooden missed 41 games with left foot plantar fasciitis, Carlos Delfino missed 33 games total, 32 with a neck strain/concussion-like symptoms, while Ersan Ilyasova (22 games), Brandon Jennings (19) and Andrew Bogut (17) all missed extended time.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks reached the playoffs for the 26th time in team history. Milwaukee’s 46-36 record was a 12-game improvement from its 2008- 09 record and a 20-game improvement from the 2007-08 season.
Rookie Brandon Jennings poured in 55 points on 21-34 from the field, including 7-8 from three and 6-8 from the free throw line, in the Bucks 129-125 win over Golden State on Nov. 14. The 55-point tally was the most by any NBA player in 2009-10 and Jennings became the fastest (seventh game, edging out Wild Chamberlain in eight games) and the youngest (20 years and 52 days) player to top 50 points in a game (LeBron James previously held the record at 20 years and 80 days). His scoring outburst was also the most points by a Bucks rookie (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar had 51 on Feb. 21, 1970) and two shy of Michael Redd’s franchise record of 57 (Nov. 11, 2006).
Center Andrew Bogut swatted away a career-best 175 shots in 69 games (2.5 per game, second in the NBA) after blocking 275 in the first 262 games of his career. He blocked a shot in a franchise record 39-consecutive games, which was the longest streak in the NBA for 2009-10 and the longest since Marcus Camby’s 51-game streak in 2007-08. Bogut entered the season outside of the franchise’s top-10 block list and finished in sixth place with 450 career blocks.
The Bucks set a franchise record with 645 three-pointers made, surpassing the previous best of 593 set in the 2001-02 season. Milwaukee finished the season with a 35.6 three-point percentage (eighth in NBA) and the 7.9 makes per game ranked sixth in the league. Brandon Jennings (145 makes, a franchise rookie record) and Carlos Delfino (134, career-high) combined for 279 threes, the most by any Bucks duo since Michael Redd (182) and Ray Allen (123) combined for 305 in 2002-03.
Milwaukee went 23-7 over a 30-game stretch where they didn’t lose consecutive games (beginning with the first win following the consecutive losses and ending with the last win). Included in that stretch were two six-game winning streaks and the Bucks were 12-1 during one stretch and extended that to 15-2.
John Salmons was acquired by Milwaukee at the trade deadline and the Bucks went 22-8 in his 30 regular season games with the team. He averaged 19.9 points on 46.7 percent shooting and 38.5 percent from three while with the Bucks.
Playoff Record

Lost to Atlanta, First Round, 3-4

Honors

Andrew Bogut - All-NBA Third Team

Brandon Jennings - NBA All-Rookie First Team, T-Mobile Rookie/Sophomore Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Skills Challenge

Highlights

The Bucks finished 2008-09 with an eight-game improvement from their 2007-08 record of 26-56. That improvement was tied for the fifth-largest in the NBA in 2008-09. Milwaukee boosted their home win total from the previous season to 22 from 19 and nearly doubled their road win total with 12 from the seven they had in the previous season.
Milwaukee’s defensive numbers improved in points allowed 100.4, 16th in the NBA (103.9, 23rd in 2007-08), field goal percentage 45.8, 16th (48.0, 29th), 3-point percentage 37.8, 23rd (38.4, 21st), steals 7.4, 12th (6.6, 21st), opponent turnovers 16.5, 1st (13.7, 15th) and opponents assist:turnover ratio 1.28:1 (1.70:1).
Milwaukee tied for the most back-to-backs with 22. The team had eight sets before the calendar shifted to December, a league-high with the next closest teams at six. The Bucks also had a stretch beginning on November 7 where they played their next 10 games as part of back-to-backs (five sets). The last time that happened was 2004-05 when Detroit played seven sets. It hadn’t happened to the Bucks since January/February of 1996.
The Bucks fell one game shy of an odd NBA occurrence that hasn't happened in more than 10 seasons. Starting with a loss to Detroit on December 27 and ending on January 17 at the L.A. Clippers, the club alternated wins and losses for 13 consecutive games, the longest such streak in the team's history. Milwaukee's longest streak of alternating wins and losses was eight games between January and February of 1973. The New York Knicks were the last team to top Milwaukee's mark of 13 games alternating wins and losses, going back-and-forth 14 times in December and January in the 1997-98 season. *Note, although the Bucks won on December 23, that game was included as part of a three-game winning string and doesn't count toward the streak.
Eight players missed a total of 138 games due to injury/illness. The team's leading scorer for the last five seasons, Michael Redd, missed 49 games. Redd was out 14 games in November with a right ankle sprain and suffered an ACL/MCL tear against Sacramento on January 24, missing the remainder of the season (35 games). Andrew Bogut, the team's leading rebounder the previous two seasons, missed a total of 46 games: three in November with a bone bruise in his left knee and then 43 from early January through the remainder of the season due to a lower back injury.
The team's main four starters entering the year - Andrew Bogut, Richard Jefferson, Michael Redd and Luke Ridnour - played a total of 20 games together and were 11-9. In 36 games with Bogut, they allowed 97.6 points and opponents shot 44.7 percent. Without him those numbers became 104.0 points and 46.9 percent. With Redd in the fold for 33 tilts, Milwaukee averaged 99.4 points while shooting 45.8 percent from the floor. When Redd was out, those numbers became 99.2 points and 43.7 percent.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

Milwaukee was just below .500 at home (19-22) and finished the year 7-34 on the road. With their 28 wins in the 2006-07 season, the Bucks won 29 or fewer games in consecutive seasons for the first time since 1992-93 (28) and 1993-94 (20). Their 56 losses were their most since the 1995-96 team went 25-57.
Milwaukee put together a five-game winning-streak, the longest of the season, from November 14-24. After defeating Dallas 97-95 on November 24, the club was a season-best three games over .500 at 7-4. In those five games they defeated Memphis, Atlanta, (at) Cleveland, L. A. Lakers and Dallas.
Rookie guard Ramon Sessions broke a nearly 40-year-old record: his 24 assists against Chicago on April 14 surpassed Guy Rodgers’ record of 21 set Oct. 31, 1968. Sessions also became the first player in franchise history to record 20 or more points and 20 or more assists in the same contest as he finished with 20 points and 24 assists.
Andrew Bogut averaged career-highs in points (14.3), rebounds (9.8) and blocks (1.7). He also had 38 double-doubles in 2007-08 comapred to 31 in his first two NBA campaigns combined.
The Bucks had three players who finished the season in the top-25 league leaders: Bogut was 9th in blocks (1.7), tied for 12th in rebounds (9.8) and 21st in field goal percentage (.511). Redd was 8th in points per game (22.7) and 24th in minutes (37.5). Williams finished in 14th in assists (6.3) and 18th in free throw percentage (.856).
Milwaukee’s rookie Yi Jianlian was the Eastern Conference Rookie of the Month for December after averaging 12.1 points, 6.6 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.1 blocks. Fellow rookie Ramon Sessions was the the Eastern Conference’s Rookie of the Month for April with 11.5 points, 11.3 assists and 5.6 rebounds in 17 games (11 starts).
Michael Redd appeared in his 500th career game this season and ranked in the top-10 in Bucks franchise history in the following categories: 10,596 points (6th), 20.5 scoring average (5th), 3,721 field goals (9th), 2,243 free throws (3rd), 911 three-pointers (2nd), 84.5 free throw percentage (7th), 38.7 three-point field goal percentage (7th), 517 games (9th) and 17,505 minutes (9th).
Mo Williams was second on the team with 89 three-pointers and Charlie Bell was third with 74. Williams then had 273 makes in a Bucks uniform (5th at the time) while Bell had 272 (6th at the time).
Michael Redd led the club in scoring for the fifth consecutive season. The only other player to lead the club in scoring for as many as five seasons was Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who did it six times.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks final record of 28-54 included an 18-23 record at the Bradley Center and a 10-31 record on the road. The season marks the first time the Bucks lost 23 games at home since 1995-96 (14-27). Their 54 losses were the most by a Bucks team since the 1995-96 team went 25-57.
In total, Bucks players missed 234 games (third most in the NBA behind Boston & Portland) due to injury or illness. All five players in Milwaukee's projected opening day starting line-up missed at least 13 games or more due to injury. Milwaukee's injury/illness total was up from the 109 games missed in 2005-06.
Michael Redd's 1,416 points over 53 games averaged to 26.7 points per game (5th in the NBA) and was also the highest for a Buck since Kareem Abdul-Jabbar averaged 30.0 points (1974-75). Redd also set a career high and broke a franchise record with 57 points against Utah (11/11), the previous record was 55 by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (12/10/71). Redd also scored 52 on March 4 against the Bulls. After the 2006-07 season, Redd moved into 10th place on the Bucks all-time scoring list with 8,964 points.
Mo Williams averaged career-highs in points (17.3), rebounds (4.8) and assists (6.1, 14th in NBA). He also became the first Buck to average at least 17.0 points and 6.0 assists in 50 games or more since Sam Cassell did it during the 2002-03 season.
Milwaukee finished 11-6 in December and averaged 107.6 points per game to their opponents’ 98.9. The team shot 48.9% from the field to their opponents’ 46.4% and grabbed 40.1 rebounds to their opponents’ 36.7. Milwaukee's 7-0 mark at home during the month was their longest home winning streak since the 2003-04 season (10 games). Michael Redd and Mo Williams both received Eastern Conference Player of the Week honors in December. Redd won twice (for the week of 11/23 - 12/3 and again for the week of 12/25 - 1/1) while Williams earned his honor for the week of 12/18 - 12/24.
Charlie Bell was the only Buck to play in every game. He appeared in all 82 contests and started 64 of them.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks finished the season 40-42 and advanced to the NBA playoffs for the 25th time in their 38-year history and for the sixth time in the last eight seasons.
Milwaukee improved 10 games from their 30-52 record in 2004-05.
In advancing to the playoffs, the Bucks became the first team in NBA history to make the playoffs with four new starters from the previous season.
Michael Redd led the Bucks in scoring 63 times. He finished the season with 2,028 points, becoming just the second player in franchise history to break the 2,000-point mark in a single season.
Redd also maintained a 25.4 scoring average (9th in the NBA), not just a career-high, but also the highest for a Buck since Marques Johnson averaged 25.6 points during the 1978-79 season.
The Bucks set an NBA record by winning their first 13 games decided by six points or less (they were also 9-0 in games decided by three points or less). They became the first team in the shot clock era (since 1954-55) to win their first 12 games decided by six points or less (12-0) when they beat Minnesota 95-92 on January 10, topping the previous record of 11 set by both the 1967-68 St. Louis Hawks and the 1959-60 Boston Celtics.
Milwaukee finished the season fourth in the league in 3FG% (.380), the second-best season mark in team history (behind only the 2002-03 squad’s 38.3%). Charlie Bell finished the year 11th in the NBA in 3FG% (.423) and teammate Bobby Simmons finished T-12th (.420).
Andrew Bogut had a fine rookie season, earning a spot on the All-Rookie First Team after averaging 9.4 points, 7.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists in 28.6 minutes per game. He was named the Eastern Conference’s Rookie of the Month for January and appeared in the TMobile Rookie Challenge Game at All-Star Weekend (along with teammate T.J. Ford).
Milwaukee set a new NBA record for fewest turnovers in a game on April 1 against Indiana. Their two miscues (since tied) beat out the old mark of three (set by seven teams). Milwaukee’s previous franchise record for fewest turnovers in a game was four.
The Bucks hit a franchise-record 18 three-pointers in their 132-110 rout of the Phoenix Suns at the Bradley Center on March 28. The 18 treys topped the previous franchise mark of 16. They also set a new NBA record after hitting 11 of those 18 triples in the third quarter.
Playoff Record

Lost to Detroit, First Round, 1-4

Honors

Andrew Bogut - NBA All-Rookie First Team; T-Mobile Rookie/Sophomore Challenge at All-Star Weekend

T.J. Ford - T-Mobile Rookie/Sophomore Challenge at All-Star Weekend

Highlights

The Bucks finished with a sub-.500 winning percentage for the first time since the 1998-99 season (30-52), but they did have their eighth consecutive winning season at home (23-18).
Michael Redd maintained a career-high scoring average of 23.0 points per game (11th in the NBA).
Redd also became just the second player in team history to lead the Bucks in scoring 50 or more times in one season (he did it 50 times). Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was the other.
Redd scored his 5,000th career point on March 4 and connected on his 500th career 3-pointer on April 13.
15 separate players missed games due to injury, illness or suspension. T.J. Ford missed the entire season while recovering from neck surgery and Redd saw a string of 212 consecutive games played snapped due to a sprained left index finger. In all, 247 games were missed.
The Bucks and Golden State Warriors tied an NBA-low for combined turnovers in a game with 11 (Milwaukee had six and Golden State had five) on March 30.
The Bucks held Seattle to 73 points on 29.4 percent shooting on February 27. The 73 points were tied for 10th for an opponent-low in Bucks history (only 13 times in their history has a team been held to 73 points or less).
The Bucks scored 78 first-half points on February 8 against Boston, including 42 second-quarter points, on their way to a 121-97 win. The 78 points were the most by the Bucks in a single half since the team scored the same amount on March 24, 1987 against New York.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks finished with a .500 or better record for the sixth consecutive season. It was the 24th .500 or better season in their 36-year history, and the team advanced to the postseason for the fifth time in the past six seasons.
In his first season as an NBA Head Coach, Terry Porter led the Bucks to a 41-41 mark. He finished tied for third in Coach of the Year voting and was also a nominee for the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award.
Milwaukee led the Eastern Conference in scoring, averaging 98.0 points per game, good for 4th place in the NBA. The Bucks committed the fewest turnovers per game (13.54) in the Eastern Conference and were third in the league in that category.
The Bucks went 33-21 against Eastern Conference opponents.
Michael Redd, the runner-up for Sixth Man of the Year in 2002-03, started every game for the Bucks, averaging a team-high 21.7 points (10th in the NBA). Redd was voted by the coaches of the Eastern Conference to appear in his first All-Star Game where he scored 13 points on 5-12 shooting with three rebounds and three steals in 15 minutes.
In January, Redd earned the Player of the Month award for the Eastern Conference after twice scoring a career-high 40 points.
At the end of the season, several Bucks were nominated for awards: Redd was named to the NBA All-Third Team and finished fifth in voting for Most Improved Player. T.J. Ford was named to the All-Rookie Second Team. Desmond Mason finished sixth in Sixth Man of the Year voting.
T.J. Ford suffered a spinal cord bruise in a February 24 game against Minnesota and missed the remainder of the season.
Milwaukee shot 0-6 from 3-point range at Phoenix in their 123-111 loss on March 20. It was the first time that the Bucks failed to make a 3-point basket since February 21, 2002, again vs. Phoenix in a 92-81 loss at the Bradley Center. It broke a streak of 191 straight games with a 3-pointer made for the Bucks.
Playoff Record

Lost to Detroit, First Round, 1-4

Honors

Michael Redd – NBA All-Star team; All-NBA Third Team; NBA All-Interview team

T.J. Ford – NBA All-Rookie Second Team

Highlights

The Bucks advanced to the postseason for the fourth time in five seasons under head coach George Karl, and for the 23rd time in their 35-year history.
Milwaukee was one of the league’s most prolific 3-point shooting teams, finishing fourth in makes (7.13) and fifth in attempts (18.61), while leading the league in 3-point percentage (.383). The Bucks tied a franchise record (since broken) with 16 treys in a 140-133 win at Cleveland on December 9. Milwaukee’s 585 treys fell just short of the all-time franchise record of 593 (set during the 2001-02 season).
Bucks sixth man Michael Redd emerged among the top 3-point shooters in NBA history. On March 30, he hit his 250th career 3-pointer to qualify as the fourth most accurate 3-point shooter in NBA history. Redd was second in the NBA in 3-point percentage (.438), third in 3-pointers made, and led the Bucks in accuracy for the second consecutive season. There were only seven games in the 2002-03 campaign in which Redd failed to deliver at least one 3-point field goal.
Sam Cassell notched his first career triple-double in his 603rd regular season NBA game at Cleveland on December 9. Cassell tallied a season-high 39 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists for the Bucks first triple-double since Ray Allen’s 20 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists at Boston on Feb. 7, 2001. Cassell doubled his career triple-double total on January 22 with a 14-point, 11 rebound and season- high 16-assist performance at Boston. Cassell was one of six players in the league to tally multiple triple-doubles during the regular season.
The Bucks were one of nine teams to increase their points-per-game production this season. Milwaukee raised its points-per-game average from 97.5 points in 2001-02 to 99.5.
Milwaukee committed a franchise low 1,044 turnovers, bettering their previous low of 1,123 established in the 1999-00 season. The 12.7 turnovers per game were second in the NBA. In the Bucks 120-93 win over Atlanta, Milwaukee committed a franchise-low four turnovers, one shy of tying the NBA record for fewest turnovers in a game.
Playoff Record

Lost to New Jersey, First Round, 2-4

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks finished one game shy of a berth in the NBA playoffs, with a 41-41 record. Despite the downturn, the Bucks did finish at .500 or better for the fourth consecutive season.
A Bucks team that stayed relatively injury free for the last two seasons had no such luck this season. Among the team’s top five scorers (Allen, Robinson, Cassell, Thomas, Redd), a total of 56 games were missed this season. That quintet appeared together in only 36 games (Bucks were 21-15). When one of the five missed a game, Milwaukee was a respectable 18-18, but when two or more were absent, the Bucks were 2-8. As a result of injuries and matchups, the Bucks fielded 17 different starting lineups this season.
The Bucks set a franchise record with 16 treys in a 115-76 win over Houston on February 20. Milwaukee’s 593 treys broke the all-time franchise record of 562, set the previous season.
Despite missing 13 games to injury, halting his consecutive games played streak at 400 (12/21 at HOU), Ray Allen finished first in the league in 3-pointers made (229) and second in attempts (528). He broke his own franchise record for 3-pointers made in a season (202), and was 11th in NBA history in all-time 3-point accuracy, with 40.8 percent success rate (928-2,276). Allen hit a franchise record 10 treys (on 14 attempts) vs. Charlotte on 4/14.
The Bucks 115-76 win over the Houston Rockets on February 20 seemed like just another game until the fourth quarter when Michael Redd scored 26 of his career-high 29 points. Redd hit eight treys in the fourth quarter to establish an NBA record for threes in a single period (and tied the NBA record for threes in a half).
On the final day of the 2001-02 season, Glenn Robinson passed the 12,000-point mark for his career. On March 6 vs. L.A. Clippers, Robinson passed Sidney Moncrief (11,594) on Bucks all-time scoring list to trail only Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (14,211).
The Bucks total home attendance (745,305) was the highest in team history. The average crowd of 18,178 exceeded the best previous average of 17,097, set in 1988-89. The 25 sellouts were the most during the Bradley Center era, breaking the previous record of 20 in 1988-89.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Ray Allen – NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Third Team

Highlights

Milwaukee captured its first Central Division crown since 1986, finishing with a 52-30 record, including 31-10 at the Bradley Center – the best home record in the Eastern Conference.
Through November 26, only two other teams had worse records than the Bucks (3-9). From November 27 on, only San Antonio (49-20) was better than Milwaukee’s 49-21 finish.
The Bucks 116-111 win over Denver on January 31 was the 600th of George Karl’s coaching career. He was only the 17th coach in NBA history to reach the milestone, and the sixth fastest coach to reach the 600 victory mark (1,005 games).
On February 13, Glenn Robinson became the fifth player in Bucks history to score 10,000 points. He became the first member of his draft class or the preceding draft class to top the 10,000-point barrier.
Ray Allen (202), Lindsey Hunter (152) and Tim Thomas (107) were the only trio of teammates in the NBA to make at least 100 3-pointers during the season. Allen’s 202 were second-most in the NBA and broke his own franchise record for treys in one season (172). Allen and Thomas shared the franchise record for three-balls in a single game (8, since broken). Thomas hit 8-of-10 threes at Portland on January 5, setting an NBA record with eight 3- pointers in a half.
Ray Allen broke the team record (329 – Lee Mayberry) for consecutive games played while at Vancouver on January 7. Allen had never missed a game to this point in his career (378) and held the NBA’s consecutive games started streak at 366.
Glenn Robinson (12/11-17) and Ray Allen (4/9-15) were each honored as NBA Players of the Week.
The Bucks won a playoff series (Orlando) for the first time since 1989. The team made it to the Eastern Conference Finals for the first time since 1986.
Playoff Record

Beat Orlando, First Round, 3-1

Beat Charlotte, Conference Semifinals, 4-3

Lost to Philadelphia, Conference Finals, 3-4

Honors

Ray Allen – NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Third Team

Glenn Robinson – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

The Bucks hit 13 treys in a 137-87 win over Charlotte on Jan. 10, 2000. The win marked the fifth time in team history that the Bucks won by 50 or more.
The Bucks compiled a 19-22 road record, their best since 1985-86.
Milwaukee went a combined 6-0 vs. teams from the state of Texas.
The Bucks boased two All-Stars (Glenn Robinson, Ray Allen) for the first time since 1990-91.
The Bucks trio of Allen, Robinson and Sam Cassell combined for 5,008 points, or 60.3 percent of the Bucks total. Only the Lakers trio of Bryant, O’Neal and Rice scored more.
On Jan. 17, 2000, George Karl became the fastest Bucks coach to reach 50 wins (89 games).
The Bucks 100-87 win vs. Indiana in Game 4 on May 1, 2000, came exactly 10 years after the Bucks last Bradley Center postseason win.
Playoff Record

Lost to Indiana, First Round, 2-3

Honors

Ray Allen – NBA All-Star Team

Glenn Robinson – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

On Aug. 29, the Bucks hired George Karl to become the seventh head coach in Milwaukee Bucks history.
A prolonged NBA lockout resulted in a 50-game season, beginning on Feb. 6, 1999.
At the trade deadline on March 11, 1999, the Bucks acquired Sam Cassell and Chris Gatling from New Jersey and Paul Grant from Minnesota in a three-team deal. Milwaukee also received Tim Thomas and Scott Williams from Philadelphia in exchange for Tyrone Hill and Jerald Honeycutt.
The Bucks finished the season with their best winning percentage (.560) since the 1990-91 season.
George Karl moved into 20th place all-time in coaching victories (531) and had the best first-year finish of any head coach in the 31-year history of the franchise.
The Bucks led the NBA in 3-point accuracy, as Dell Curry led the NBA with a career-high .476.
Robert “Tractor” Traylor led all rookies in field goal percentage (.537).
Playoff Record

Lost to Indiana, First Round, 0-3

Honors

None

Highlights

The 30th Anniversary edition of the Milwaukee Bucks opened 1997-98 with eight new faces, representing the single largest turnover in club history (since broken).
The Bucks 36-46 record was a three-game improvement over the 1996-97 season and marked the best record since the 1990-91 squad that finished 48-34.
The Bucks scored a then-franchise-low 62 points at Chicago on Dec. 5, 1997.
Bucks finished fifth in the NBA in free throw percentage (.767) and 10th in field goal percentage (.456).
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

On June 19, 1996, Chris Ford was hired to replace Mike Dunleavy as head coach. Dunleavy retained his title as Vice President of Basketball Operations for the season, then resigned on April 26, 1997.
Milwaukee’s 33-49 record marked an eight-victory improvement over 1995-96.
Vin Baker (21.0 ppg) and Glenn Robinson (21.1 ppg) scored 42.5 percent of the team’s total points. Baker and Robinson were also the NBA’s only teammates to each average 21 points.
Baker’s 10.3 rebounds per game made him the first Bucks player to average 20 points and 10 rebounds for a season since Abdul-Jabbar in 1974-75.
Rookie Ray Allen scored the franchise’s 100,000th field goal on January 18 at Atlanta.
Glenn Robinson became the Bucks first NBA Player of the Week in six years when he took the honor for the week of Jan. 6-12.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Vin Baker – NBA All-Star Team

Ray Allen – NBA All-Rookie Second Team

Highlights

The Bucks suffered a franchise-record 15-game losing streak in March (3/4 - 3/30).
For the third straight season, the Bucks led the NBA in fewest games missed due to injury/illness with 18.
Vin Baker and Glenn Robinson scored 43.2 percent of the Bucks points on the season, ranking second in the NBA in 1995-96, behind only Jordan/Pippen (46.2%). They entered the books as the second-highest Bucks tandem ever (1971-72, Abdul-Jabbar and Dandridge, 45.7%).
Against Utah on March 18, 1996, Lee Mayberry broke Junior Bridgeman’s team record, appearing in his 309th straight game.
The Bucks welcomed their 5,000,000th fan to the Bradley Center on February 13 vs. Philadelphia.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Vin Baker — NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

With the first overall pick in the 1994 NBA Draft, the Bucks tabbed Glenn Robinson from Purdue. Robinson averaged 21.9 points per game, tops among all rookies, and led the Bucks in scoring.
Milwaukee’s 34-48 overall record represented a 14-victory improvement over the 20-62 mark of 1993-94, the third-best jump in the NBA behind only Dallas (+23) and the L.A. Lakers (+15).
The Bucks suffered the biggest defeat in franchise history, a 152-104 loss to Orlando on Feb. 20, 1995.
The Bucks topped the NBA for the second straight season in fewest games missed due to injury/illness with 10, the fewest in club history.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Vin Baker – NBA All-Star Team

Glenn Robinson – NBA All-Rookie First Team

Highlights

Milwaukee’s 20-62 overall record was the worst in the 26-year history of the franchise.
Milwaukee established franchise season-lows (since broken) for total points with 7,949 (the previous mark was 8,254 in 1974-75) and scoring average at 96.9 ppg (100.7 ppg in 1974-75).
Milwaukee reached the 12 million mark in all-time home attendance on March 31, 1994 vs. Portland.
The Bucks ranked first in the NBA with only 21 player games missed due to injury/illness.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Vin Baker – NBA All-Rookie First Team

Highlights

The 25th Anniversary edition of the Milwaukee Bucks opened 1992-93 with seven new faces on their roster, representing the single largest turnover in club history (since broken).
The “Young Bucks” were under the direction of Mike Dunleavy, Sr., named the team’s head coach on May 12, 1992.
The Bucks won 10 of their first 13 games but posted a record 18-51 mark over the final 69 games to finish at 28-54 overall.
Milwaukee recorded a new club record for fewest turnovers in a game with five vs. Los Angeles Lakers on January 3, 1993 (since broken).
An NBA record was set against the Bucks when Miami’s Brian Shaw hit 10 3-pointers on April 8, 1993 in the Bradley Center.
Milwaukee finished second in the NBA in steals with 863 (10.52 per game).
The Bucks snapped a 14-game losing streak at the Boston Garden with a 115-109 win over the Celtics on March 12, 1993.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks sixth-place finish in the Central was the lowest since the team moved into the division in 1980-81.
On Dec. 4, 1991, with Milwaukee sporting an 8-9 record, Del Harris relinquished his head coaching duties to concentrate on the club’s basketball operations. Frank Hamblen, his top assistant for the previous four seasons, was named head coach.
Milwaukee led the NBA in steals (863) for the third straight season and ranked second in turnovers forced at 17.3 per game.
The Bucks set a new single-game mark with 24 steals vs. Orlando on March 6, 1992.
Milwaukee finished second in the league in 3-point field goal percentage at 36.9 (371-1,005).
Dale Ellis led the triple attack as he set new individual club records with 138 3-pointers and 329 trey attempts (both records have been broken).
Milwaukee grabbed a club record 1,297 offensive rebounds, breaking the old mark of 1,261 set in 1980-81.
The Bucks exploded for 53 points in the fourth quarter of a game at Cleveland on Nov. 12, 1991, establishing a new club record for points in a quarter.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks clawed to a 48-34 mark to finish third in the Central and post their 12th consecutive winning season.
Milwaukee entered the 1990-91 campaign as the winningest team in the history of the NBA, averaging 49.31 victories per season since joining the league in 1968-69.
The season began with 18 straight Bradley Center victories by the Bucks, setting a franchise record for consecutive home wins within a season.
The Bucks set a club record and topped the NBA for the second consecutive season in steals with 894 (the previous team-best for thefts in a season was 867 in 1977-78).
The Bucks were .500 or better against each of the four divisions (Atlantic 17-7, Central 16-14, Midwest 7-7, Pacific 8-6).
Milwaukee posted 16 victories in games it trailed at the half, a total which tied Portland for the league best.
The Bucks made their 12th straight playoff appearance and 19th in the 23-year history of the franchise.
For only the fifth time in 18 series, the Bucks lost a playoff series in which they held the homecourt advantage.
Playoff Record

Lost to Philadelphia, First Round, 0-3

Honors

Alvin Robertson – NBA All-Star Team and NBA All-Defensive First Team

Ricky Pierce – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Milwaukee overcame a record 235 missed player games due to injury to finish third in the Central Division at 44-38.
The Bucks registered their 11th consecutive winning season, a streak second only to the Lakers string of 14 in a row.
On Nov. 9, 1989, the Bucks battled Seattle in a five overtime marathon that etched its mark in NBA annals as the second-longest professional game on record (4:17). The Bucks captured a 155-154 victory over the Sonics.
On Nov. 16, 1989, the Bucks tied a league mark by scoring 50 points in the first period vs. Orlando.
The Bucks topped the league in steals (10.1 spg) while finishing second in forced turnovers (18.4 TO's per game).
Ricky Pierce became the first reserve ever to lead the team in scoring (23.0 ppg).
Alvin Robertson broke the club record for steals in a season with 207.
Milwaukee qualified for post season competition for the 11th straight year and 18th time in 22 seasons.
Playoff Record

Lost to Chicago, First Round, 1-3

Honors

Ricky Pierce – NBA Sixth Man Award

Highlights

Milwaukee became the top free throw shooting team in NBA history by shooting 82.073%, eclipsing the old standard of 82.054% set by Kansas City- Omaha in 1974-75 (since broken).
The Bucks posted franchise win number 1,000 on Dec. 6, 1988, with a 109-84 win over Detroit.
The Bucks topped 30 wins at home for the ninth straight year (31-10).
The Bucks were the only team to not lose an overtime game in 1988-89 (2-0).
Milwaukee qualified for the playoffs for the 10th straight year and 17th time in 21 seasons.
Fred Roberts substituted for injured Terry Cummings and tallied a playoff career-high 33 points vs. Detroit.
Paul Pressey did not play in the playoffs due to a dislocated right shoulder sustained late in the regular season.
Playoff Record

Beat Atlanta, First Round, 3-2

Lost to Detroit, Conference Semifinals, 0-4

Honors

Terry Cummings – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Prior to the season, the Bucks hosted the inaugural McDonald’s Basketball Open, which also featured the Soviet National Basketball team and the reigning European champions, Tracer Milan of Italy.
Milwaukee recorded its ninth straight winning season and 15th in the storied 20-year history.
The Bucks finished the season with an awesome 992-648 (.605%) all-time record, bettered only by the Boston Celtics.
The 1987-88 season saw the curtain close on an incredibly successful run in the Arena, as the Bucks prepared to move into the Bradley Center.
On Dec. 4, 1987, the Bucks snapped Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s string of 787 double figure scoring games. Ironically, the last time Abdul-Jabbar failed to score in double digits was the first game of the 1977 season, also on the MECCA floor.
Jack Sikma became the tallest man in NBA history to win the NBA free throw title by shooting 92.2% from the line.
The Bucks string of 52 consecutive months of .500 or better basketball ended after a 6-9 record in January.
Paul Pressey became the club’s all-time leader in assists, topping Brian Winters on March 16, 1988.
Junior Bridgeman was honored on Jan. 17, 1988, when his uniform (#2) was retired.
In the final season at the Arena, the Bucks drew 452,057 fans to the Milwaukee Arena, including 38 of 41 sellouts.
Milwaukee qualified for the playoffs for the ninth consecutive season and 16th time in 20 years.
Playoff Record

Lost to Atlanta, First Round, 2-3

Honors

None

Highlights

The Bucks notched their seventh consecutive 50-win season, but the streak of seven straight division championships was snapped by Atlanta.
The Bucks played .500+ basketball in every month, extending their streak to an incredible 50 months of .500 basketball.
Milwaukee finished a perfect 24-0 when holding opponents under the century mark.
Jack Sikma, acquired in a pre-season trade with Seattle, averaged 12.7 ppg and 10.0 rpg.
The team set an all-time attendance mark averaging 11,000 fans in 41 dates, including 36 sellouts – only 2,145 seats went unsold for the season.
The Bucks sent Julius Erving into retirement with a Game Five win in the first round vs. Philadelphia.
After the season, Don Nelson resigned and, on June 4, 1987, was replaced by Del Harris.
Playoff Record

Beat Philadelphia, First Round, 3-2

Lost to Boston, Conference Semifinals, 3-4

Honors

Ricky Pierce – NBA Sixth Man Award

Highlights

The Bucks notched their sixth straight Central Division title and seventh straight division crown.
Milwaukee set team records for free throws made (2,063) and attempted (2,701) in a season.
The Bucks set a single-game record for field goal percentage, scorching the nets at .667 in a rout of Sacramento, 140-82, on December 15, 1985.
Craig Hodges set Bucks records for 3-point FGM (73) and 3-point FGA (162) for a season (both records have since been broken).
The Bucks advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals for the third time in four years.
Paul Pressey set the Bucks single game playoff record for FTM (15) and FTA (17) vs. Philadelphia May 7, 1986.
Craig Hodges snared eight steals at Philadelphia (May 9, 1986) setting the Bucks single game playoff record. The Bucks recorded 19 steals to set a new team record.
Playoff Record

Beat New Jersey, First Round, 3-0

Beat Philadelphia, Conference Semifinals, 4-3

Lost to Boston, Conference Finals, 0-4

Honors

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Second Team and NBA All-Defensive Team

Paul Pressey – NBA All-Defensive Team

Highlights

A Sept. 29, 1984, trade netted Terry Cummings, Ricky Pierce and Craig Hodges in exchange for Marques Johnson, Junior Bridgeman, Harvey Catchings and cash.
On Dec. 6, 1984, the Bucks retired #16 of center Bob Lanier.
For the fifth straight campaign, the Bucks notched 50 victories, averaging 55 wins over that five-year span.
Led by Sidney Moncrief and Paul Pressey, the Milwaukee defense led the league for the second time in a row, allowing only 104 ppg.
The Bucks set a new club standard for home wins, recording a stellar 36-5 mark.
Pressey tied the Bucks single playoff game mark with 16 assists vs. Philadelphia on April 30, 1985, and May 7, 1985.
On March 1, 1985, the sale of the Milwaukee Bucks to Herb Kohl from Jim Fitzgerald was finalized. Four days later, Jane and Lloyd Pettit announced they would donate $30-40 million to build a new arena.
Playoff Record

Beat Chicago, First Round, 3-1

Lost to Philadelphia, Conference Semifinals, 0-4

Honors

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Star Team, NBA All-Defensive Team, and All- NBA Second Team

Terry Cummings – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Second Team

Paul Pressey – NBA All-Defensive Team

Don Nelson – NBA Coach of the Year

Highlights

For the fifth consecutive season, the Bucks won their division, while making the NBA’s final four for the second straight year.
The Bucks led the league in defense, allowing just 101.5 ppg while also leading the league in defensive FG% (.456).
Junior Bridgeman moved into the top spot on the Bucks all-time games played list.
Marques Johnson scored his 10,000th point in front of a national CBS audience.
Moncrief set the Bucks mark for free throws in a season, 529.
Bucks set a team single playoff game mark of 55 free throw attempts at New Jersey May 3, 1984 (42 FTM).
Playoff Record

Beat Atlanta, First Round, 3-2

Beat New Jersey, Conference Semifinals, 4-2

Lost to Boston, Conference Finals, 1-4

Honors

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Star Team, NBA Defensive Player of the Year, All-NBA Second Team and NBA All-Defensive Team

Highlights

Don Nelson earned NBA Coach of the Year honors, guiding the team to a fourth straight division title.
Sidney Moncrief was named the NBA Defensive Player of the Year and earned a spot on the All-NBA team while leading the club in scoring (22.5 ppg).
The Bucks set a franchise record by blocking 532 shots (since broken) and committing a low 1,421 turnovers on the season (since broken).
The Bucks handed eventual champion Philadelphia their only playoff loss of the postseason.
Playoff Record

Beat Boston, Conference Semifinals, 4-0

Lost to Philadelphia, Conference Finals, 1-4

Honors

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Star Team, NBA Defensive Player of the Year, All-NBA Team and NBA All-Defensive Team

Marques Johnson – NBA All-Star Team

Don Nelson – NBA Coach of the Year

Highlights

The Bucks captured their third straight division title and second consecutive Central Division title. Milwaukee posted the largest season-ending division lead in the NBA (13 games).
Milwaukee overcame an 18-game holdout by All-Star Marques Johnson at the start of the season and weathered the storm of 114 player games missed due to injury.
Sidney Moncrief earned his first berth on the All-Star squad. Center Bob Lanier also made the All-Star squad.
The Bucks scored a team record 166 points, including a team record 97 in the first half, vs. San Antonio March 6, 1982 in a classic 3-overtime thriller.
Alton Lister tied the Bucks playoff mark for blocked shots in a game with 7 at Philadelphia May 5, 1982.
Playoff Record

Lost to Philadelphia, Conference Semifinals, 2-4

Honors

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Second Team and NBA All-Defensive Team

Bob Lanier – NBA All-Star Team

Quinn Buckner – NBA All-Defensive Second Team

Highlights

Following a divisional realignment, the Bucks began their first year in the Eastern Conference. The Bucks were paired in the Central Division with Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Indiana.
The Bucks finished with a 60-22 record to become the 19th team in the history of the NBA (and fourth Bucks team) to reach the magical 60-win plateau.
Milwaukee became the 17th team in NBA history to lose no more than two games consecutively.
The Bucks won 10 in a row early in the season and also set a franchise record with 11 straight road wins from Oct. 18-Nov. 23, 1980.
Quinn Buckner broke the Bucks season mark for steals with 197 (since broken).
The Bucks swatted 18 shots vs. Detroit on Nov. 12, 1980, to set a team record which still stands.
The Bucks averaged 113.1 ppg, tops in the Eastern Conference.
The Bucks set a team single-game playoff mark with 45 free throws at Philadelphia April 7, 1981.
Playoff Record

Lost to Philadelphia, Conference Semifinals, 3-4

Honors

Marques Johnson – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Second Team

Quinn Buckner – NBA All-Defensive Second Team

Highlights

The Bucks won their sixth Midwest Division title – and first since 1975-76.
The 3-point line is introduced to the NBA game – Brian Winters hit 38 of the team’s 50 treys.
On Feb. 4, 1980, at the All-Star break, the Bucks dealt Kent Benson and a first round draft choice to Detroit for Bob Lanier. After Lanier’s arrival, the team went 20-6.
The Bucks played to 99.7 percent of capacity, selling out 39 of 41 games, including the final 38 contests.
In the Conference Semifinals, an NBA-record crowd of 40,172 attended game five at the Kingdome, where the Bucks won 108-97. The Sonics ultimately won the series in seven games.
Playoff Record

Lost to Seattle, Conference Semifinals, 3-4

Honors

Marques Johnson – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Second Team

Quinn Buckner – NBA All-Defensive Second Team

Sidney Moncrief – NBA All-Rookie Second Team

Highlights

Dave Meyers was lost for all 82 games of the regular season due to a back injury.
Marques Johnson was named to the NBA All-Star Team, receiving more fan votes than any other player in the Western Conference. Johnson finished third in the NBA in scoring with a 25.6 average.
Junior Bridgeman finished the season with a 15.5 average, tops among Sixth Men.
The Bucks shattered the NBA assist record with 2,562 on the year for a 31.2 average (since broken).
On Dec. 26, 1978 vs. Detroit, the Bucks set NBA records for assists in a game (53) and in a quarter (19). They also set a team record for margin of victory (59) in the 143-84 win.
On March 14, 1979, vs. New Orleans, the Bucks scored 87 points in a half (a team record) and scored 158 points, a franchise-best for a non-overtime game.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Marques Johnson – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Team

Highlights

Prior to the season, on June 20, 1977, John Killilea, once a scout for the Bucks and more recently an assistant coach in Boston, was named assistant coach and assistant director of player personnel.
The Bucks drafted three of the top 11 players in the 1977 Draft, adding Kent Benson, Marques Johnson and Ernie Grunfeld to a group that included veterans Junior Bridgeman, Quinn Buckner, Dave Meyers and Brian Winters.
The Bucks set an all-time NBA record (later broken) by winning eight overtime games.
The Bucks earned a playoff berth on the final day of the season when Seattle beat Golden State. Milwaukee swept the favored Suns 2-0 in the first round mini-series and took Denver to a tough seven games before succumbing.
The Bucks set five team playoff records against Denver on April 23, 1978. – field goal percentage (.660), blocked shots (13), most points half (87), most points quarter (47, fourth quarter) and assists (46).
Playoff Record

Beat Phoenix, Conference First Round, 2-0

Lost to Denver, Conference Semifinals, 3-4

Honors

Brian Winters – NBA All-Star Team

Quinn Buckner – NBA All-Defensive Second Team

Marques Johnson – NBA All-Rookie Team

Highlights

On Sept. 9, 1976, Don Nelson joined the Bucks as an assistant coach.
That same month, the last original Milwaukee Buck, Jon McGlocklin, retired from the NBA as the Bucks third all-time leading scorer with 7,507 points (currently ranks 12th) in 595 games in a Milwaukee uniform. On Dec. 10, 1976, his #14 jersey was retired by the Bucks.
A group headed by James F. Fitzgerald, William J. Blake and the J.P. Cullen and Son Corporation purchased 361,000 outstanding shares of Milwaukee Professional Sports and Services common stock. On Nov. 4, 1976, Fitzgerald was elected chairman of the board and president of Milwaukee Professional Sports and Services.
Only 18 games into the season Larry Costello resigned as head coach after a 3-15 start and was replaced by Nelson.
Bob Dandridge was the team’s leading scorer once more, with 20.8 points per game.
Swen Nater set the Bucks record for rebounds in a single game with 33 vs. Atlanta on Dec. 19, 1976. After the season, Nater was traded to Buffalo for the third overall pick in the 1977 Draft (Marques Johnson).
Milwaukee hosted the NBA All-Star Game on Feb. 13, 1977. Julius Erving, with 30 points, was named MVP in the West’s 125-124 win.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Quinn Buckner - All Rookie Second Team

Highlights

The four players acquired in exchange for Abdul-Jabbar combine for 50.0 ppg, led by 18.2 ppg from Brian Winters, who joined Bob Dandridge on the All-Star team.
Dandridge became the first player other than Abdul-Jabbar since 1968-69 to lead the Bucks in scoring. Dandridge averaged 21.5 points per game (9th in NBA).
Despite the sub-par record, the Bucks won the Midwest Division for the fifth time in eight seasons.
Prior to the playoffs, Coach Larry Costello signed a new two-year pact.
In the postseason, the Bucks were beaten in the First Round of the best-of-three playoff series 2-1 by Detroit.
Playoff Record

Lost to Detroit, First Round, 1-2

Honors

Bob Dandridge – NBA All-Star Team

Brian Winters – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Oscar Robertson announced his retirement on Sept. 3, 1974.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar suffered a broken hand during the preseason and was sidelined for the first 16 games of the season. The Bucks went 3-13 without their star.
No player appeared in all 82 games for the Bucks.
Jim Price was acquired in exchange for Lucius Allen on Nov. 9, 1974. Price earned an All-Star berth in his first season in Milwaukee, but a cartilage tear in his left knee ended his season after only 50 games.
The Bucks had three players (Abdul-Jabbar, Price and Dandridge) on the All-Star team for the first time in club history.
In falling just short of a playoff berth, the Bucks lost 18 games by five points or less.
Abdul-Jabbar finished third in the NBA in scoring (30.0 ppg), fifth in rebounds (14.0 rpg) and first in blocks (3.26 bpg). Dandridge finished 18th in scoring with a 19.9 ppg average.
After the season, on June 16, 1975, Abdul-Jabbar and Walt Wesley are dealt to the Los Angeles Lakers in exchange for Elmore Smith, Brian Winters, David Meyers, Junior Bridgeman and future considerations.
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA All-Star Team and All-Defensive Team

Jim Price – NBA All-Star Team

Bob Dandridge – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Oscar Robertson signed a one-year contract to play in his 14th and final season.
Lucius Allen tore cartilage in his knee in a game on March 15 at Detroit and was sidelined for the remainder of the season and the entire playoffs.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar blocked 10 shots in a game vs. Detroit on Nov. 3, 1973, and also set team records for defensive rebounds in a season (891) and blocked shots in a season (283).
Abdul-Jabbar was named MVP for the third time in five seasons, averaging 27.0 ppg and 14.5 rpg.
The Bucks led the league in point differential at +8.1 per game.
The Bucks eliminated Los Angeles, 4-1, in the opening round and dispatched Chicago, 4-0, in the Conference Finals to return to the NBA Finals.
Against Boston in the NBA Finals, the Bucks forced Game Seven with a double-overtime win in Boston, courtesy of an Abdul-Jabbar sky-hook from deep in the corner. In Game Seven, the host Bucks were defeated by the Celtics 102-87.
Abdul-Jabbar set a Bucks playoff record for field goals made in a game (20, at Chicago, April 8, 1974), and Oscar Robertson set the Bucks mark for assists in a playoff game with 16 at L.A. on April 2, 1974.
Playoff Record

Beat Los Angeles, Conference Semifinals, 4-1

Beat Chicago, Conference Finals, 4-0

Lost to Boston, NBA Championship Finals, 4-3

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA Most Valuable Player, NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Team and NBA All-Defensive Team

Bob Dandridge – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Prior to the season, on August 18, 1972, Abdul-Jabbar signed a four-year contract extension.
The Bucks became the first team in NBA history to post 60 or more wins in three consecutive seasons.
Abdul-Jabbar set a team record with 24 field goals vs. Houston at Madison Jan. 25, 1973.
Abdul-Jabbar finished the season ranked second in scoring (30.2 ppg) and fourth in rebounding (16.1 rpg). In late March, he scored the 10,000th point of his career in only his fourth NBA season.
Bob Dandridge was named to his first NBA All-Star team, joining Abdul-Jabbar on the West squad.
The Bucks set an NBA record with 14 consecutive wins to end the regular season.
In the postseason, the Bucks were surprised by a deep Golden State team, 4-2, in the opening round.
Playoff Record

Lost to Golden State, Conference Semifinals, 2-4

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Team

Bob Dandridge – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

Prior to the season, Lew Alcindor legally changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.
Abdul-Jabbar enjoyed his second straight MVP season, averaging a league-best 34.8 ppg and 16.6 rpg (third in NBA).
On Dec. 10, 1971, Abdul-Jabbar scored 55 points vs. Boston, a team record. Abdul-Jabbar set seven other club records – FGA, game (39 vs. Los Angeles, March 17, 1972); points, season (2,822); scoring average (34.8); FGM, season (1,159); FGA, season (2,019); total rebounds, season (1,346); and minutes, season (3,583).
On Jan. 9, 1972, the Bucks defeated the L.A. Lakers 120-104, snapping L.A.’s 33-game winning streak.
On Feb. 4, Oscar Robertson strained a leg muscle and missed 17 games down the stretch.
After disposing of Golden State in the first round of the playoffs, the Bucks faced the Lakers for the Western Conference championship, falling in six games.
Abdul-Jabbar set the team single-game playoff mark for field goal attempts (37) vs. Los Angeles April 14, 1972.
The Bucks set playoff single-game franchise records for field goal attempts – 115 vs. Los Angeles on April 22, 1972 and rebounds –75 vs. Los Angeles on April 16, 1972.
Playoff Record

Beat Golden State, Conference Semifinals, 4-1

Lost to Los Angeles, Conference Finals, 2-4

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA Most Valuable Player, NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Team

Oscar Robertson – NBA All-Star Team

Highlights

In the first season of the NBA’s four-division alignment, the Bucks ran away with the Midwest division, setting an NBA record (since broken) of 66 wins. The Bucks also set NBA records for home wins (34), road wins (28), field goal percentage (.509), field goals made (3,972) and assists (2,249).
From Feb. 6-March 8, 1971, the Bucks won 20 straight games, an NBA record (since broken).
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was the league’s MVP, leading the NBA in scoring with 31.7 ppg. He finished second in FG% (.577) and fourth in rebounds (16.0).
Oscar Robertson, in his first season with the Bucks, dished a then-team-record 668 assists and was named an All-Star for the 11th consecutive year.
On April 4, 1971, the Bucks beat San Francisco 136-86, marking their biggest playoff win.
The Bucks dispatched San Francisco and Los Angeles in five games and blasted Baltimore in four straight for the NBA Championship, marking only the second time in league history that the title series ended in a sweep.
In winning the World Championship in only their third season, the Bucks went further, faster, than any expansion team in the history of major professional sports.
Playoff Record

Beat San Francisco, Conference Semifinals, 4-1

Beat Los Angeles, Conference Finals, 4-1

Beat Baltimore, NBA Championship Finals, 4-0

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA Most Valuable Player, NBA All-Star Team, All-NBA Team, and All-Defensive Second Team

Oscar Robertson – NBA All-Star Team and All-NBA Second Team

Highlights

Bucks lineup bolstered by addition of rookies Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (first round) and Bob Dandridge (fourth round), both of whom earned ‘All-Rookie’ status.
Abdul-Jabbar became an instant superstar, earning unanimous NBA Rookie of the Year honors and leading the Bucks to a 29-game improvement over the previous season. He finished as the league’s second-leading scorer (28.8) and third-leading rebounder (14.5).
Abdul-Jabbar set the franchise single-game record with 25 free throw attempts at Boston on March 8, 1970. He also set the season mark with 743 free throw attempts.
Flynn Robinson set a team mark for FT% in a season (since broken) at .898, leading the NBA.
Bucks established team records with 48 free throws and 62 attempts at Boston on March 8, 1970.
On March 30, 1970, at Philadelphia, Bucks set club playoff records for points (156), field goals made (67) and assists (46).
The Bucks made the playoffs in only their second season. Abdul-Jabbar set two Bucks single-game playoff marks with 46 points vs. Philadelphia (at Madison) on April 3, 1970, and 31 rebounds vs. New York on April 17, 1970.
After the season, on April 21, 1970, the Bucks acquired All-Star guard Oscar Robertson from Cincinnati for Flynn Robinson and Charlie Paulk.
Playoff Record

Beat Philadelphia, Division Semifinals, 4-1

Lost to New York, Division Finals, 1-4

Honors

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – NBA All-Star Team, NBA All-Rookie Team, NBA All-Defensive Second Team, All-NBA Second Team, NBA Rookie of the Year

Flynn Robinson – NBA All-Star Team

Bob Dandridge – NBA All-Rookie Team

Highlights

Charlie Paulk of Northeastern State (Okla.) was the Bucks first first-round pick in the 1968 Draft.
On Oct. 16, 1968, before a crowd of 8,467 at the Milwaukee Arena, the Milwaukee Bucks made their NBA debut, an 89-84 loss to Chicago.
Bucks set a home attendance record for a first-year team, averaging 6,246 fans at the Arena.
Milwaukee’s 27 wins were the second highest by an expansion team in NBA history.
Flynn Robinson hit 21 free throws vs. Atlanta on Feb. 17, 1969, which remains a team record.
Guard Jon McGlocklin led the team in scoring with a 19.6 average and was the Bucks first representative at the All-Star Game.
The 1968-69 squad owns franchise records for most rebounds (4,727) and most FG attempts (8,258) in a season.
On Dec. 11, 1968, the Bucks set a team record with 85 rebounds in a 106-96 win over San Francisco (at Madison).
Bucks finished last in the Eastern Division to qualify for a coin flip (with Phoenix) to determine rights to top choice in the college draft. On March 19, 1969, NBA Commissioner Walter Kennedy flipped the coin; Phoenix chose heads, the coin came up tails. On April 2, 1969, the Bucks signed 7’2" Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar).
Playoff Record

Did not qualify

Honors

Jon McGlocklin – NBA All-Star team