2018 NBA Playoffs
2018 NBA Playoffs

Series preview: Long-awaited matchup arrives for Houston Rockets, Golden State Warriors

Superstars abound in showdown between West's two powerhouse squads

Sekou Smith

Sekou Smith NBA.com

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May 9, 2018 8:28 AM ET

James Harden and the Rockets must get past the Warriors to reach their first Finals since 1995.

Finally, it’s here.

The series the NBA world has been waiting for from the moment Chris Paul requested a trade last summer that sent him to the Houston Rockets to join forces with James Harden has arrived. It's the Rockets vs. the four-time Western Conference and two-time NBA champion Golden State Warriors for West supremacy.

The Rockets had a feeling they could see this journey through to this point, even when the teams met on opening night at Oracle Arena. Houston was built to beat the champs, and did it twice in their three regular season encounters.

Rockets center Clint Capela voiced his opinions on the matchup after a January win, saying his team was superior to the champs. And hes just as eager for this match up, in which the Rockets hold home-court advantage.

 
Who has the edge in the 2018 Western Conference finals?

Im real excited,” Capela said. This (Warriors) team is going to be hard, its going to be a fight. Theres going to be a lot of adjustments after every game. Its going to be a chess game. Of course, were going to be ready. Theyve been to The Finals three straight years. So were just excited. Everybody's excited about it. Im sure all the NBA fans are excited about it, too.”

The Warriors are fired up, too, and have heard all the chirping.

Now youve got to play the game,All-Star forward Draymond Green said. You wanted us, now youve got us.

The Warriors are attempting to conquer the West for a fourth straight season, but this will be their first West finals without home-court advantage. Doing it against a team specifically designed to take them down just adds to a battle wrought with connections.

 
Golden State busted out its "Hamptons Five" lineup in the West semifinals.

Harden, Paul, Green, Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson all won gold medals together, be it on the Olympic or World Cup of Basketball stage. Harden and Durant were teammates on the Oklahoma City Thunder team that lost The Finals in 2012. Pauls LA Clippers squad in 2014 was the last West foe to knock the Warriors out of the playoffs before The Finals. And the Rockets were the team the Warriors beat in the 2015 West finals to jump-start their would-be dynasty.

Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni pioneered the style the Warriors have used to dominate the league while he was coaching in Phoenix, where Warriors coach Steve Kerr was the Suns GM.

The 3-pointers will fly from all directions. Both teams are capable of defending at a championship level. The personnel on both sides is ideally matched. Perhaps best of all, though, is that both teams are healthy and without any ready-made excuses overshadowing this showdown.

 
The Rockets are West finals-bound for the first time since 2015.

Its best on best, a test of collective wills between the cream of the Western Conference crop,as Curry declared after the Warriors and Rockets each won their West semifinal series just hours apart on May 8.

The NBA world has been waiting on this heavyweight showdown. Now, its finally here.

3 quick questions and answers

  1. Who flinches first, Kerr with his Hamptons Fivelineup or DAntoni with his Harden-Paul-Capela trio? Against every other team in the league, the Warriorssmall-ball unit of Durant, Thompson, Curry, Green and Andre Iguodala has a clear advantage. No one else has three shooters like Durant, Curry and Thompson playing alongside the versatile Green and Iguodala. The Rockets come close with Harden, Paul and Capela alongside defensive specialists and 3-point marksmen Trevor Ariza and P.J. Tucker. Itll be a fascinating study in styles watching them matchup against each other. But advantage Warriors ... until we see someone crack the code against the "Hamptons Five." 
     
  2. Whats more valuable -- Houston's home-court advantage or Golden State's experience? Home-court advantage is always preferred. The Warriors know that. Its been good to them in each of the past three seasons grinding through the West playoffs to The Finals. But it’s not infallible (as the Cleveland Cavaliers taught us, rallying from a 3-1 Finals deficit to take Game 7 at Oracle Arena). Which is exactly why the Rockets need to have the threat level turned all the way up for Games 1 and 2. Lose either one of the first two games at Toyota Center and the Warriors will pounce in this series.
     
  3. Who is the biggest wild card for each team? And, are they capable of swinging this series? Its Eric Gordon for the Rockets and whichever big man (JaVale McGee, Zaza Pachulia, Kevon Looney or perhaps Jordan Bell) that Kerr taps for service for the Warriors. Gordon has to shoot more consistently than he has thus far in the playoffs (34.2 percent overall, 31.4 percent on 3-pointers) if the Rockets hope to match the Warriors basket for basket. The Warriors have a big man for basically every season, its just a matter of which one will fare best against a much-improved Capela. He has outplayed two more heralded bigs (All-Star Karl-Anthony Towns and the Jazz's Rudy Gobert) in each of the Rockets’ series to date. Overall, though, there's too much star power in this series for any role player to swing the momentum for more than a few minutes.

The number to know

100.7 --The two best offensive teams in the regular season have been the two best defensive teams in the playoffs, combining to allow just 100.7 points per 100 possessions on their way to the conference finals. In the first round, the Rockets and Warriors held the Minnesota Timberwolves and San Antonio Spurs to 5.6 and 5.2 fewer points per 100 possessions than they scored in the regular season, respectively. And in the conference semifinals, they held the Utah Jazz and New Orleans Pelicans to 7.0 and 16.2 fewer points per 100 possessions than they scored in the first round, respectively. The Rockets' starting lineup has allowed just 92 points per 100 possessions in its 153 minutes, having forced more than 21 turnovers per 100 (the best mark among lineups that have played at least 75 minutes). The Warriors' "Hamptons Five" lineup, meanwhile, has allowed less than 87 points per 100 possessions in its 54 minutes, and the champs have allowed just 94 points per 100 possessions in 250 total minutes with Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala on the floor together. These teams aren't just here because of how potent their offenses are, and the team that advances to The Finals will be the one that continues to defend at a high level. -- John Schuhmann

Making the pick

The Rockets made it their mission to put together a group to avenge their 2015 and 2016 playoff failures, with the Warriors serving as their primary target. Theyve got home-court advantage, an inspired Paul and what appears to be all of the requisite parts needed to interrupt the Warriorsdynasty plans. But do they have the nerve to snatch it all from Golden State, which took a measured approach to 2017-18 and has seemingly flipped the proverbial with another championship run on the line? Experience over ambition this time. Warriors in 6.

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Sekou Smith is a veteran NBA reporter and NBA TV analyst. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter.

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