The Human Highlight Film. He's a Hall of Famer and one of the most exciting players to watch in the history of the NBA.

When it comes to dunking, they're aren't many in the class with Dominique Wilkins. He had the elevation, the creativity, the hang time and the power. In this author's opinion, he's the second best dunker of all time, just behind Vince Carter, and I wouldn't put up much of an argument if you preferred 'Nique.

Wilkins participated in the dunk contest five times. He was the champion in 1985 and 1990, the runner-up in 1986 and 1988, and finished third in 1985.

This week, in preparation for All-Star 2007 and the Sprite Slam Dunk competition, NBA.com has put together Dunk-A-Thon, a thorough collection of the greatest dunks in NBA History.

We talked with Dominique about his best dunks, the dunk contest and this year's competitors:

NBA.com: What do you think your best in-game dunk was?
Dominique Wilkins:
Wow. That's a great question. I've had quite a few. For the top five, you picked five good ones. Because you know, those dunks were in traffic. It's hard to be that creative in traffic, especially against guys that big.

NBA.com: Personally, my favorite is the Bird one, because you basically put him through the rim ... and that's Larry Bird.
DW:
Well you know, he's one of the greatest players in history, so that will always share a special place in your heart.

NBA.com: What about your best dunk contest dunk?
DW:
Probably in Chicago, the one with Jordan and I. I think two of my best dunks were definitely in that contest.

NBA.com: I just want to know how you get a 50 for a one-handed windmill and a 45 for a two-handed windmill.
DW:
I should have got a perfect score on the whole contest. But, the most satisfying thing for me was that we had two of the greatest dunkers in history going head to head, and we enjoyed it. We didn't care who won or lost. We entertained the fans.

NBA.com: Which is tougher: the one-handed windmill or the two-handed one?
DW:
The two-handed windmill is definitely tougher because you gotta come across your body. That's very difficult to do.

NBA.com: Are you looking forward to this year's competition?
DW:
I'm looking forward to it. You got some new guys that are gonna be in it, so you're kind anxious to see what they're gonna do and how creative they're gonna be.

NBA.com: Thoughts on Gerald Green?
DW:
He's a high riser. I'm interested to see how creative he's gonna be.

NBA.com: How about Dwight Howard?
DW:
There haven't been that many big guys in history that have done well in the dunk contest. Shawn Kemp is one. He was creative. Larry Nance was probably the top big man who's been in it. So, I'm anxious to see how Dwight Howard does. He's another guys who's 6-11 and can jump out of the gym, so we'll see how creative he's going to be.

NBA.com: What did you like about Nate Robinson last year?
DW:
Well, he's a little guy, and everybody loves the little guy. Now that they've changed some of the rules, guys have to concentrate more on the dunks they're trying to attempt.

NBA.com: You were in the dunk contest five times. Is it tougher coming back after you've done it already?
DW:
Not really, because when I won it the last time, I had been in the league eight years already. So, I did it late, I did it several times, but I enjoyed it. It was enjoyment for me.

NBA.com: Is there pressure to come up with something different?
DW:
There's pressure to come up with something different, but the thing is, I didn't do too many different things. I just put different variations to the dunks I already did to make it look different, but it was somewhat the same dunk.

NBA.com: Is there a specific dunk that was the best or most impressive to you over the years?
DW:
It's hard to say one, because we've had a lot of guys that were great dunkers ... Dr. J ... Larry Nance had a great two-ball dunk ... Vince Carter ... myself. There's too many guys to say that one dunk stands out more than the other.

NBA.com: Who was the best dunker that didn't win a dunk contest?
DW:
David Thompson, definitely. Definitely.

NBA.com: What was it about him that made him so good?
DW:
The elevation, the hang time, the creativity. He did it all.